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Author: Samantha Hilker

CMS Ambulance Open Door Forum: Rescheduled

The Ambulance Open Door Forum has been rescheduled from March 14th to NEW DATE date, April 11th at the same time of 2:00pm-3:00pm ET. Thank you.

Register Here

Overview:

The Ambulance Open Door Forum (ODF) addresses issues related to the Medicare payment, billing, and coverage for air and ground ambulance services. The Ambulance Fee Schedule (AFS) proposed and final rules, rural and other additional payments under the AFS, and Prior Authorization of Repetitive, Scheduled Non-Emergent Ambulance Transport (RSNAT) are just some of the many types of issues addressed within the forum. In addition, discussions differentiating the rules related to ambulance providers and independent ambulance suppliers are facilitated. Timely announcements and clarifications regarding important rulemaking, agency program initiatives and other related areas are also included in the forum.

CMS Releases New GADCS Tip Sheet for Rural, Super Rural Services

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released a new “Reporting for Rural and Super-Rural Organizations Tip Sheet” on February 16, 2024. This guide assists ground ambulance organizations in rural and super-rural areas to meet the Medicare Ground Ambulance Data Collection System (GADCS) requirements.

You can find all of their tip sheets, including those focused on allocation, governmental, and public safety organizations, on the CMS GADCS website.

Services selected as part of the Year 3 and Year 4 list are due to submit their 2023 data to CMS by May 31, 2024, or 5 months after the close of their fiscal year. The AAA offers various resources to help services collect, verify, and submit data on time and avoid penalties. For more information about our resources, including Amber, email hello@ambulance.org.

CMS Updates GADCS User Guide | Feb 29 Office Hours

CMS header
Dear Ground Ambulance Providers and Suppliers,

Starting January 1, 2024, selected ground ambulance organizations in Year 3 and Year 4 are required to report cost, utilization, revenue, and other information to CMS. Organizations that fail to report may be subject to a 10 percent payment reduction.

Learn about an updated user guide and upcoming webinar:

Medicare Ground Ambulance Data Collection System: Updated GADCS User Guide

CMS updated the step-by-step Medicare Ground Ambulance Data Collection System (GADCS) User Guide to include changes that we finalized in the CY 2024 Physician Fee Schedule final rule.

More Information:

 

Medicare Ground Ambulance Data Collection System: Office Hours Session – February 29

Thursday, February 29 from 2–3pm ET

Register for this webinar:

Do you have questions about the Medicare Ground Ambulance Data Collection System (GADCS)? CMS and our contractors will address GADCS-related questions in real-time. While everyone is welcome to participate, this session will be most relevant to selected ground ambulance organizations in Year 3 and Year 4 of the GADCS as they begin reporting data to CMS in 2024.

This session will be divided into 2 topics:

  • 2–2:30pm: GADCS instructions and how to respond to specific questions
  • 2:30–3pm: User accounts, accessing the GADCS portal, and information technology issues

Visit  Medicare Ground Ambulance Data Collection System for resources including:

  • Printable version of the GADCS instrument in English and Spanish
  • Updated GADCS User Guide
  • Tip sheets on reporting and getting access to the GADCS, FAQs, and prior educational sessions
  • Lists of ground ambulance organizations required to participate in Years 1–4

Medicare Ground Ambulance Data Collection System Overview Webinar – January 18

CMS header

Dear ground ambulance providers and suppliers,

Starting January 1, 2024, selected ground ambulance organizations in Year 3 and Year 4 are required to report cost, utilization, revenue, and other information to CMS. Organizations that fail to report may be subject to a 10 percent payment reduction.

Medicare Ground Ambulance Data Collection System Overview Webinar – January 18

Thursday, January 18 from 2– 3:30 pm ET

Register for this webinar. While everyone is welcome to participate, this session will be most relevant to selected ground ambulance organizations in Years 3 and 4 as they start reporting Medicare Ground Ambulance Data Collection System (GADCS) data to CMS in 2024.

This 60-minute presentation will cover all aspects of the GADCS, including:

  • Overview and key concepts
  • Section walkthrough
  • User accounts, logging in, and linking to your organization
  • Submitting and certifying your data

A Q&A session will follow the presentation.

More Information:

  • Ambulance Events webpage: The January 18 presentation will be posted here
  • Medicare Ground Ambulance Data Collection System webpage:
    • Printable version of the GADCS instrument in English and Spanish
    • GADCS User Guide
    • Tip sheets on reporting and getting access, FAQs, and prior educational sessions
    • Lists of ground ambulance organizations required to participate in Years 1–4

Employee Turnover Study Due 4/30 | iPad Raffle

The American Ambulance Association is partnering with Newton 360, an ambulance industry partner and Human Resource support firm, to conduct our fifth annual industry turnover study. Our intent is to comprehensively collect and analyze ambulance industry employee turnover data to produce a report that provides useful and actionable data. We are inviting EMS organizations to participate in the study. The study will be conducted and managed by Dennis Doverspike, PhD, and Rosanna Miguel, PhD, who are associated with the Center for Applied Talent Analytics at John Carroll University. Each individual or organizational response will be strictly confidential.

The purpose of the study is to better quantify and understand the reasons for turnover at nearly every organizational level within the EMS Industry. Thank you very much for your time and support.

Laying the Groundwork for Reducing Employee Turnover

Why participate in the survey?

  1. Educate elected officials, municipalities, and healthcare clients. The insight gained from this survey can help influence the actions, practices, or decisions of officials regarding regulatory and funding policies at the federal, regional, or local level. Specifically, this important data can help validate the critical staffing challenges faced by the EMS industry. This year, we continue to have queries related to the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency (PHE) even though it is scheduled to end on May 11, 2023. We feel that it is important to understand the lingering impact of the PHE on EMS turnover and its related costs.
  2. This study is critical to gaining insight into combating staff shortages. The AAA / Newton 360 2023 Ambulance Industry Employee Turnover Study aims to yield the information that organizations need to identify and benchmark their turnover challenges. Over the years this survey has been conducted, it has generated the largest response to a turnover survey ever published for the private EMS industry.
  3. Participating organizations will have full access to the final report at no charge. The comprehensive results of the study will be shared exclusively with each participating organization. Shorter write-ups and summaries of the results may be shared at conferences or published in relevant periodicals or journals.

Before You Start

It is recommended you gather information about your employees and about turnover before completing the questionnaire.

In this survey, we will be asking about headcount (filled and open positions), the number of employees leaving the organization, and reasons for employees leaving. We will be asking these questions for each of the following job categories: supervisor, dispatch, EMT, part-time EMT, paramedic, and part-time paramedic. Headcount refers to the number of filled and open positions for each job category at the end of 2022. Filled positions refer to the number of employees in each job category that were on payroll at the end of 2022. For each job category, the number of filled positions should be added to the number of open positions at the end of 2022 to determine the total headcount.

The survey will open on April 17th, 2023, and close at end of the day, on April 30th, 2023. The survey can be accessed by following the link below. If the hyperlink does not work when clicked, please copy the hyperlink and paste it into your browser.
https://johncarroll.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_57s6B8d92GW44wS

Take the Survey

Thank you,
Scott Moore, Esq.
Newton 360
Workforce Dynamics, Inc.
(781) 236-4411 office
(781) 771-9914 mobile
www.newton360.com

Employee Retention Tax Credit Quick Take

Recently, members have asked numerous questions about the COVID-19-related Employee Retention Tax Credit (ERTC).  HR/Operations Consultant Scott Moore, Esq., addresses common areas of confusion and shares information about the ERTC program in this Quick Take.

 

Workforce Resource: Total Compensation Statement & Calculation Sheet

Part of any successful recruitment and retention strategy is having a competitive compensation and benefits package. This is achieved most successfully by providing employees with a Total Compensation Statement.

A Total Compensation Statement communicates and provides an employee with a picture of the value of an employee’s compensation package, including wages and other costs which are typically shown in an employee’s paystub. However, a Total Compensation Statement shows the hidden costs, many paid by the employer on behalf of the employee, such as employer-paid healthcare, retirement, payroll taxes, and other supplements that employers provide. The purpose is to provide employees with the full picture of compensation and arm them with information about how your organization stacks up against your competitors.

Attached are two samples of Total Compensation Forms that can be used by AAA member companies. The forms offer the ability for our members to personalize by inserting their company logo.  These are typically issued on a quarterly, bi-annual, or yearly basis.

Total Compensation and Benefits Statement
The Total Compensation and Benefits Statement is a fillable PDF form that performs the calculations as you enter the different compensation-related items. The costs are shown in two columns, one for the employee wages and other costs, and the other for the often-hidden cost paid by the employer on the employee’s behalf.

Total Compensation Calculation Spreadsheet
The Total Compensation Calculation Spreadsheet is also a fillable PDF form that performs the calculations as you enter the different compensation-related items. There is a column that allows the employer to provide a Description of the benefit item listed. The costs are shown in two columns, one for the employee wages and other costs, and the other for the often-hidden cost paid by the employer on the employee’s behalf.

About the AAA Workforce Committee
The AAA Workforce Committee was formed by the AAA Board of Directors with the committee charge to evaluate and assist AAA member companies with the factors that impact the recruitment and retention of qualified EMS employees. If there are compensation or benefit items that we failed to include that you believe should be part of these documents, please let us know!
Send your feedback to hello@ambulance.org.

American Ambulance Association 2021 Award Winners Announced

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Media Contact
Amanda Riordan
media@ambulance.org

 AMERICAN AMBULANCE ASSOCIATION ANNOUNCES 2021 AWARD WINNERS

Washington, DC, October 5, 2021—Shawn Baird, President of the American Ambulance Association (AAA), announced the 2021 Award Winners at the AAA board meeting on September 21st.  The awardees are as follows:

Affiliate of the Year

  • The Mercury Group – for their strategic outreach shining the light and attention on the role that EMS plays in the pandemic.
  • Sellers Dorsey – for their efforts in support of state Medicaid supplemental payments for EMS providers.

Partnership of the Year

  • International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC), International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF), and the National Association of EMTs (NAEMT) for their collaboration throughout the pandemic on both legislative and regulatory issues.

Distinguished Service Award

  • Jon Krohmer, Director, NHTSA’s Office of EMS – for his tireless efforts during the Public Health Emergency (PHE).
  • Maria Bianchi, AAA Chief Executive Officer – for her unwavering dedication and leadership through a global pandemic.

President’s Award

  • Asbel Montes, Acadian Ambulance Service, Lafayette, Louisiana for his leadership on ground ambulance policies, future payment reform initiatives, and balance billing.

Robert L Forbuss Lifetime Achievement Award

  • Josef (Joe) Penner, Medic (Mecklenburg EMS Agency) for his decades of service, leadership, and vision in EMS.

Walter J. Schaefer Award

  • Rachel Harracksingh, Life Ambulance, El Paso, Texas for her leadership, guidance, and tenacity in growing AAA’s political outreach and presence on Capitol Hill.

The Awards will be presented at the AAA Annual Conference and Trade Show President’s Reception on Tuesday, November 2, 2021, at the Gaylord Hotel in Grapevine Texas.


About the American Ambulance Association

The American Ambulance Association safeguards the future of mobile healthcare through advocacy, thought leadership, and education. AAA advances sustainable EMS policy, empowering our members to serve their communities with high-quality on-demand healthcare.

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Family Liaisons Following EMS Line of Duty Deaths

I was just a kid when I started in EMS. 23 years old, hungry for adventure, and ready for everything the world of EMS was prepared to give me. Car accidents, gunshot wounds, stabbings, intoxicated shenanigans, elderly falls, fist fights, medical emergencies, strokes, and cardiac arrest were all on my list of expected possibilities. One of the scenarios I had not thought of, and nobody presented to me throughout school and orientation, was the possibility of clocking in for shift and not going home. I do not recall line of duty deaths being a discussion point in the paramedic curriculum, job interview, or orientation process. I had experienced the unexpected loss of a younger sibling due to a motor vehicle crash before I started my journey in EMS, but the fact that life is short and unpredictable did not connect with the fact that I was knowingly and willingly walking myself into unknown and potentially dangerous situations with each response. Even after the UW Med Flight crash happened early in my career, and in my service area, we simply did not talk about our own potential for death as a direct result of our profession.

Years later, after many more line of duty deaths and even more reports of violence against EMS and healthcare workers, this topic weighs heavy on my mind. In my time as Staff Development Manager for a service, I pushed for the DT4EMS courses to train our medics on how to recognize potential dangers, escape those situations, and defend themselves if they are unable to escape.  We all know the ‘scene safe/BSI’ tagline and list of what things might make a scene unsafe is not enough. As the Rescue Task Force (RTF) formed, I watched as some were excited for the opportunity to be involved and others started to question their willingness to respond to so many unknown situations as their young families were beginning to grow. I started asking myself if EMS agencies are doing enough in terms of preparing themselves and their employees for the possibility of a line of duty death.

The Line of Duty Death Handbook, published in part by the AAA, is a great tool to start building policies, protocols and personnel records. The handbook guides you through the importance of having employees fill out emergency contact and next of kin forms, and keeping them updated, as well as assigning family liaisons and how to manage coverage for funeral services. As I reviewed this, I started thinking about the assignment of a family liaison—a member of your agency who knew the individual well and will be the primary contact for everything the family needs once the notification has been made. What type of person should be assigned this role, and what kind of training should they have? I sat down with KC Schuler, MDiv and board member for the Fox Valley Critical Incident Stress Management group to discuss.

What are some considerations services should make when putting together their line of duty death policy/procedure?

I think the first significant consideration should be conducting pre-incident training. I mean, are you starting the conversation about critical incident stress exposure all the way up to, and including, the possibility that they may never go home to their family, at orientation? During onboarding? So many of the EMTs and Paramedics coming in are young, and this may be their first job. In my experience, they can be somewhat blind to the possibilities. Early education and creating a culture of support—including letting them know you have their back (and their family’s back) in every potential scenario is important. The second consideration, I think, is to determine what scope you define as a line of duty death. The on-shift motor vehicle crash or incident resulting in death while on the clock is apparent, but what about suicide? If someone is having significant job-related stress and commits suicide, will that be looked at as a line of duty death, or not? This is something all organizations need to consider before such an event happens.

S: What type of actions would you recommend take place, or are discussed, as part of the orientation process?

KC: This is a great time for employees to fill out the emergency contact and next of kin form—this also provides an opening to discuss the possibility of death and the importance of filling out the form accurately and keeping it up to date. They are the best ones to tell you who you should notify in such a situation; guessing in the event of a death is not ideal. A portion of orientation and annual training should also be spent on mental health, including awareness, recognition of post-traumatic stress symptoms in themselves and their peers, and available support resources. Trained peer support and EAP can be very valuable in the management of work and home related stressors. Again, being intentional to build and sustain an organizational culture of support prior to an unfortunate tragedy like a line of duty death will help all those involved.

S: The Line of Duty Death Handbook talks about assigning a family liaison—a person who becomes the 24/7 primary contact for the family once notification has been made. This person should be available, in person and via phone, and dedicated to the family whether it is household chores such as mowing the lawn and grocery shopping, to communicating with out of town family members and arranging hotels. Who should be considered for such an assignment, and what might the service do to prepare these individuals?

KC: This is a high-intensity assignment, and this role should not be assigned to shifts in the beginning either. Being a family liaison is a big responsibility, and it is not a responsibility that should shift from person to person; ideally, the family will have one liaison for the duration. Trust is a significant factor—the family must trust the individual they are assigned, so that individual must be able to build that trust or recognize early if it is not a good match. Services should consider the following in their selection of a family liaison:

  1. Someone who is specially trained in being a family liaison. The nature of this position is demanding and can significantly interfere with the liaison’s personal life and responsibilities of emotionally supporting another. They need to be able to have clear boundaries, open lines of communication to leadership, and have a stellar support system in place as well. The International Critical Incident Stress Foundation does offer a 2-day LODD course.
  2. Preferably, the family liaison would not have any other roles (such as being an honor guard member) as they will likely have other duties and responsibilities throughout the process and at the funeral itself. The liaison duties need to be 100% dedicated to the family.
  3. Gender sensitivity—If the deceased is a male, you may want to assign a female liaison to the spouse as there can be a lot of strong emotions during this time and unhealthy attachments can form. You should consider gender identity and sexual preference in assigning a liaison as well.

Training and preparation of individuals for family liaison assignment should happen before an event like this ever occurs.

S: If I am a service director looking to send a few people to train for this, what type of people should I look for?

KC: If I had to provide a list of characteristics for liaison selection, it would probably include someone who:

  1. Does not gossip and respects confidentiality.
  2. Can make things happen—someone who is comfortable making, and either has the authority to make decisions on behalf of the service, or has direct contact with someone who can.
  3. Has a great support system of their own.
  4. Understands and respects boundaries—can set limits where appropriate and necessary.
  5. Is comfortable speaking, but also understands and can recognize the importance of silence, or when not to respond.

S: When it comes to families, there are a lot of dynamics a liaison might have to contend with such as divided families or family members that do not get along. If more than one individual is involved in a LODD, such as two members killed in a car accident, there may also be dynamics between those two families that need to be considered. What are your recommendations for addressing those type situations, where either a single family or multiple families may be at odds?

KC: If there is more than one family involved (i.e., two employees) you will want to assign each family a liaison, and those liaisons will need to be in close communication with each other and the organization leadership. One thing agencies may wish to consider is holding family support or family networking events throughout the year, before an event like this happens. I mean, beyond the Christmas parties and summer picnics where all families are invited—events that allow family members of your employees to get together, build relationships, and form a support system between families who understand the dynamic of supporting someone in EMS. If families are meeting for the first time as the result of a fatal accident, the dynamic will likely be much different (and more difficult) than if they are afforded a place to get to know each other and form bonds before such an event would happen. It is a lot easier to blame a stranger than a friend; it is easier to share pain and experience with someone you share a bond.

If there is pre-incident conflict within a family, such as animosity between divorced parents or an ex-spouse, these situations become more difficult to manage. Training will help the liaison better navigate and handle these situations.

S: You mentioned before, the importance of knowing the resources in your area—what would you say to those services who might plan to reach out to their local CISM or hospital for a family liaison or other support in this situation?

KC: As I mentioned before, EAP is a valuable resource but likely not the best as a stand-alone support in the event of LODD, and it certainly would not be able to function as a family liaison. Many hospitals may have pastoral care staff, such as myself; however, many would not have the capacity to operate as a family liaison or the awareness, authority, and connections to make decisions on behalf of your service. So, neither of these options would not be the best plan in my opinion. CISM teams can help in debriefings, but again, that is different than functioning as a family liaison. Some of your staff members that are trained as CISM peer counselors, however, may be excellent candidates for continued training in LODD and more specifically, as family liaisons.

S: You also mentioned how the family liaison should be taken off shift responsibility and assignments while they are functioning as the family liaison. What time frame should a service expect, and could the director or administrative staff function as the liaison to reduce scheduling disruptions?

KC: The time frame will be variable and unique to each situation; this is part of the importance of a service’s selection and training of these individuals. They need to determine when the family needs the high-intensity liaison, when to move to periodic support, and when to transition out to periodic or then eventual annual check-ins. They need to do this without creating a co-dependence.

A director or administrative staff would not be the ideal candidate for the family liaison assignment. The director will be busy dealing with many other operational details and would not be able to devote the time or attention to the family during the high-intensity phase. Ideally, the liaison will be someone the fallen individual knew, worked alongside, and had a good relationship with; someone who can share some stories with the family. The liaison’s ability to do this goes back to the importance of fostering the family/spousal support network as well.

There are many ways in which services can prepare for a line of duty death. Option one is to bury your head in the sand and pretend it will never happen to you. This, we know, is a lie; a lie to ourselves, our employees and their families. Option two is to address the potential with eyes wide open and full support starting in orientation and stretching through the selection of qualified employees for advanced training. Even if I am lucky enough never to experience a LODD personally, I would rather work for an organization adopting option two every time.

“It is a curious thing, the death of a loved one. We all know that our time in this world is limited and that eventually all of us will end up underneath some sheet, never to wake up. And yet it is always a surprise when it happens to someone we know. It is like walking up the stairs to your bedroom in the dark, and thinking there is one more stair than there is. Your foot falls down, through the air, and there is a sickly moment of dark surprise as you try and readjust the way you thought of things.”

― Lemony Snicket, Horseradish

What I Wish I Had Known

Congratulations! You were selected for the Paramedic Supervisor position, if you accept, we’ll start the transition immediately.

I remember the excitement I had when I heard those words so many years ago. The excitement that carried strongly through 2 days of celebrating with my husband, anticipating the new world I was about to be part of; making a mental list of all the mountains I couldn’t wait to move! This excitement was quickly drowned by a sinking feeling deep in my gut. It felt like running out of gas on a country highway at one in the morning and your cell phone is dead; it’s dark, there is nobody around, and you cannot phone a friend.

Whether it comes right away, or later—because of the reaction of people we thought were friends or feeling overwhelmed in a new situation you were expected to handle with precision, we’ve all felt that feeling as a new leader. By sharing our stories with one another, the success and the failures, we all grow.

I remember getting so much advice from those who walked the road before me, some solicited some not. The stories were sometimes shocking, often comical and always gave me perspective and insight into my own blunders – most importantly the stories many shared with me taught me the importance of humility and the ability to laugh at myself, admit my mistakes, learn and move on. At some point, the tide started turning, and friends and colleagues began asking me for my stories and advice. Although I often felt like I wasn’t experienced (i.e. old enough) to be offering any advice I realized it’s not necessarily the age or years of experience behind the story that makes it meaningful. The power is in the ability to share an experience through storytelling—finding common ground amongst the hierarchy of titles and job descriptions.

I think it is easy to lose sight of how our words and actions can affect others as we are wrapped up in our day to day and moving down the checklist of tasks. The influence of a leader in an organization, even an informal leader, is long lasting and not to be taken for granted. Over the past year, I’ve been talking to many EMS leaders of the past and present. I’ve been asking them what they wish they would have known when they first started their leadership journey, and what advice they might give to others just starting out. Here are 10 of the most common answers I received.

Top 10 Things I Wish I Had Known

  1. I wish I would have known I could be myself. Being myself earned me the role, but suddenly it didn’t seem like enough. At first, I thought others were putting all this pressure on me to be an amazing supervisor immediately – in hindsight, I realize I was putting the pressure on myself and it was totally unnecessary. Being myself allowed me to be a more effective supervisor for my team and I wish it hadn’t taken me so long to figure it out.
  2. I wish I would have learned earlier how important listening is. Listening to understand your people, listening to learn and listening to understand the politics that are happening beyond the surface.
  3. I wish I would have known that I didn’t have to be right all the time; I wasn’t expected to be right all the time. I was only expected to be an honest and reliable resource for my team.
  4. Change is slow. PAINFULLY slow. In EMS there is constant instant gratification – you see a problem with a patient, you fix it, you drop them off. Transitioning to an administrative role and learning that change is slow and takes time (SO MUCH TIME!) is more difficult than I ever would have imagined. I had to really learn to see the long game.
  5. It’s not a “day job”. As a leader, you’re never off duty. Whether you’re on a regular rotation as a shift supervisor, or in the office as a manager or director, EMS is a 24/7 world which means you work nights, weekends and holidays right along with your team. You may not be on a truck or at a station—but you’re still available to them all the time.
  6. I wish I would have understood how important mission, vision, and values really are to a company, and how important it is to talk about them with staff.
  7. We’re all learning, and it is OK to ask for help.
  8. Just because a staff member is asking me a question, it does not mean they are challenging my authority. As a leader, it took me a long time to realize that I should embrace a staff member challenging a decision so long as they are doing it in a constructive manner.
  9. I wish I would have known how much of an impact I have on people. I don’t mean that in an arrogant way. I’ve had staff bring up conversations we had years ago, and I had forgotten all about it—but they were still carrying that encounter with them.
  10. That it wasn’t for me. I thought I wanted to be a supervisor – a leader. I was wrong. I was unhappy with the role and everyone knew it but me, and I was becoming destructive.
    When I came to the realization that I wasn’t the right person for the role, my boss allowed me a front row seat to the best example of leadership I have personally witnessed. He allowed me to step back from the role but didn’t forget about me; he continued to invest in me as an employee and as an individual despite the certain protest of others. To this day, he continues to provide guidance on my professional endeavors and is someone I truly look to for honest advice.

5 Can’t-Miss EMS Podcasts

Podcasts are a great way to gain information and insight on a variety of topics.  With the intimidating number of podcasts on the topic of EMS and leadership available, it can take a bit of time to find the one that’s right for you.  I have been a fan of podcasts for several years now, and while some of my favorites have dropped off over the years, I am certain there are many new favorites out there waiting to be discovered.

If you’re not yet listening to podcasts, I encourage you to start exploring – here is a quick list of some of my current favorites in EMS and leadership to get you started. (* We’ve included links are iTunes, but these podcasts can be found on just about any podcast service.)

  1. Prehospital Emergency Care Podcast
    This is a newer podcast, and quickly landed on my subscribed list for the obvious reason; it is the official podcast for the NAEMSP. The first few episodes were recorded during the most recent NAEMSP annual meeting, in the most recent the hosts spend time interviewing authors of studies published in the PEC journal, discussing results questioning when, and how, changes should be implemented based on those results.  I’ve been able to make the NAEMSP conference a few times, and it is truly enjoyable.  This podcast is a nice way to keep up on the research and recommendations coming from the NAEMSP.
  2. EMJ Podcast
    This podcast discusses the research published in the Emergency Medicine Journal (EMJ) and is a great listen, in my opinion. The hosts are easy to listen to and the way they discuss the research and potential application is thought provoking, particularly given the international perspective.
  3. CPR Podcast
    This podcast is a little bit of everything in EMS. While most of the episodes seem to have a clinical education spin, others delve into some standard practice, leadership, and provider health and safety topics as well.  The conversations are well planned without seeming overly rehearsed which ads a measure of sincerity to the commentary.
  4. Dear HBR
    This is a newer podcast and is produced by the Harvard Business Review.  While not directly related to EMS, there is value for EMS listeners.  Individuals write to the show and ask questions – many of which are about how to handle conflicts or difficult situations in the workplace – and the hosts discuss the question at hand and the advice they might give the individual based on personal experience and available research.  There is so much we can learn through the experience of others, and this is a good way to compare our own experience with the experience of others, and perhaps walk away with some good advice.
  5. EM Weekly
    This focus of this podcast is emergency management (EM), but the discussion topics span everything from tactical planning to leadership and future possibilities. The host and guests mix in a bit of the history of EM throughout the episodes which helps provide perspective and understanding of the evolution of emergency management over time, and ideas for the future.

Editor’s Note

Samantha Hilker, author of this article, is the host of the excellent EMS in Wisconsin podcast created by the Professional Ambulance Association of Wisconsin. Don’t miss it!

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