COVID-19 Coronavirus EMS Advisory 1

This guidance is written to offer American Ambulance Association members the situational background and a list of resources and websites with which to draw guidance and further updates on the latest situation with COVID-19, colloquially referred to as “Coronavirus.” Key information for this update has been drawn from the NHTSA EMS Focus series webinar What EMS, 911 and Other Public Safety Personnel Need to Know About COVID-19, which took place on February 24, 2020. The on-demand recording is available below. General Information Background The COVID-19 Coronavirus Disease was first reported in Wuhan China in December 2019. CDC identifies that it was caused by the virus SARS – CoV-2. Early on, many patients were reported to have a link to a large seafood and live animal market. Later, patients did not have exposure to animal markets which indicates person-to-person transmission. Travel-related exportation of cases into the US was first reported January 21, 2020. For reference the first North American EMS experience of  COVID-19 patient transport, including key lessons learned, can be found in the EMS 1 article Transporting Patient 1. Spread and Identification Global investigations are now ongoing to better understand the spread. Based on what is known about other coronaviruses, it (more…)

Cross-Cultural Communication for EMS

Barriers to Understanding In all healthcare settings, successful communication with patients and families depends on awareness of three key barriers to their understanding and compliance: Cultural Barriers: Understanding western medicine and the U.S. healthcare system is a challenge for many of us, but it is especially problematic for recent immigrants and refugees. 72% of U. S. population growth in the next 20 years will come from immigrants, or the children of immigrants. Limited English Proficiency: The number of people who spoke a language other than English at home grew by 38 percent in the 1980s and by 47 percent in the 1990s. While the population aged 5 and over grew by one-fourth from 1980 to 2000, the number who spoke a language other than English at home more than doubled. Low Health Literacy: While poor understanding of the health care system and difficulty understanding health care instructions may be associated with language and cultural barriers, low health literacy is also found in patients who are proficient in English and who share the common U.S. culture. This latter group may be especially at risk of having their low health literacy go unrecognized. 90 million “mainstream” Americans cannot understand basic health information. (more…)