American Ambulance Association 2022 Award Winners Announced

 AMERICAN AMBULANCE ASSOCIATION ANNOUNCES 2022 AWARD WINNERS

Washington, DC, August 29, 2022—The American Ambulance Association (AAA), is pleased to announce the 2022 Award Winners.  The awardees are as follows:

Affiliate of the Year

  • Savvik Buying Group

Partnership of the Year

  • Boundtree and Prodigy EMS

Distinguished Service Award

  • Scott Moore – Moore EMS Consulting

President’s Award

  • Rob Lawrence – Pro EMS

Robert L. Forbuss Lifetime Achievement Award

  • Michael Hall – EMS Administrator, Florida Department of Health
  • Mark Postma – PatientCare EMS Solutions
  • Aarron Reinert – Lakes Region EMS

Walter J. Schaefer Award

  • Richard Zuschlag – Acadian Ambulance

The Awards will be presented at the AAA Annual Conference and Trade Show President’s Reception on Monday, September 19, 2022, at the Gaylord Opryland in Nashville, Tennessee.


About the American Ambulance Association

The American Ambulance Association safeguards the future of mobile healthcare through advocacy, thought leadership, and education. AAA advances sustainable EMS policy, empowering our members to serve their communities with high-quality on-demand healthcare.

EMS Gives Life | Help EMT Dave Find His Wife Kelly a Kidney

Help Firefighter EMT Dave Find his wife Kelly a Kidney

Help Firefighter EMT Dave Raymond find a Kidney for his wife Kelly

Dave Raymond is asking you to help him save the life of his wife, Kelly! Kelly needs a kidney transplant to live. Both Dave and their son, Christopher, are firefighter EMTs. They are committed to saving people’s lives every day. The hardest thing in the world is not being able to save Kelly on their own.  Now Dave is turning to the community and his fire service/EMS family to ask for help.

A Message from Dave Raymond

My name is Dave Raymond and my lovely wife is Kelly. I’m a Lieutenant on the Hamilton (MA) Fire Department and an EMT/ESO Manager for Cataldo Ambulance. Kelly and I have been married for 27 years and are proud parents of a son, Christopher, who is also a firefighter EMT for Hamilton Fire. Our family has a strong history of community involvement and a dedication to helping others. We are blessed with a great family and friends who are of tremendous support. Like all families, we have had obstacles to overcome and we’ve always figured it out. When Kelly’s kidneys started to fail and she was placed on the transplant waiting list in 2020, I really thought I would be her donor and everything would be okay. I have since learned that I’m not medically eligible to be a kidney donor. I never thought I would be asking for this type of help from friends, acquaintances, and even strangers, but here I am, asking for someone to be a kidney donor for my wife, Kelly. I need help to save her!

Kelly’s Medical History of Diabetes and Kidney Disease

Kelly has struggled with medical issues all her life. She has Type 1 (Juvenile) Diabetes which created many health complications. But one by one, Kelly has overcome and moved on, keeping an incredibly optimistic outlook. In 2013 she lost her leg to diabetes but has adapted very well. In 2020 her kidneys started shutting down rapidly and it was determined that she would need a kidney transplant to live. In the meantime, Kelly is doing dialysis 7 days a week to keep going. It is difficult, but we are grateful that dialysis buys her some time while we search for a donor. Many people have stepped up for Kelly and all but one has been found medically ineligible to donate. Unfortunatley the one approved donor had a major family crisis that put kidney donation on hold indefinitely. We are continuing to fight for Kelly and we know that someone will see our story and volunteer to help. When you and your family are used to helping others, it is the hardest thing to do to ask for help – but I’m asking.

“I want my mom to feel better and live without constant sickness.”

– Christopher Raymond, son, Firefighter EMT

Becoming a Kidney Donor for Kelly

This is the most important thing to know – you do not need to be a match to be a kidney donor for Kelly! If you are healthy enough to be a kidney donor, you can donate on Kelly’s behalf. Through the National Kidney Registry’s standard voucher program, you can donate a kidney to someone who is the best match to you. And because of your donation, you can give Kelly a voucher that will take her from the 100,000-person national waiting list to a National Kidney Registry living donor list. They will find her a match typically in months, instead of years. But she is only eligible for the living donor list if someone donates a kidney on her behalf. That’s why we need you.

Important Information for Potential Donors

  • Kelly is a patient at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston which is a National Kidney Registry (NKR) member center.
  • You do not need to be a match to be a kidney donor for Kelly. If you are healthy and eligible to donate a kidney, your donation can provide Kelly with a voucher that prioritizes her for a kidney donation that is her best match.
  • You do not need to come to Boston to donate a kidney on Kelly’s behalf. You can be evaluated and donate through any of the National Kidney Registry’s 100 member centers nationwide.
  • One healthy kidney can do the work of two and donors can live a full, healthy life with only one kidney. Kidney transplant surgery is very safe with a short hospital stay and fairly quick recovery times.
  • There is no financial burden for donors. Kelly’s insurance pays for all medical testing, evaluation, and surgery. NKR’s Donor Shield program provides reimbursement for lost wages, travel, and lodging.
  • There are supports and protections available for living donors as well as mentoring by someone who has been a living kidney donor. In the unlikely event that a kidney donor needs a kidney transplant in the future, they will be prioritized on the living donor list.
  • EMS Gives Life will provide support to potential donors, from considering donation through the donation process.
  • There is no commitment to learn more.
  • All inquiries are held in complete confidence by EMS Gives Life.

Would you consider being Kelly’s kidney donor?

Good news…

You don’t need to be an exact match to be a donor for Kelly!

If you’re healthy enough to donate a kidney, you can be a donor on Kelly’s behalf!

  • You can do testing, evaluation, and surgery at a hospital close to home and on your schedule.
  • You will get cost reimbursement for lost wages, travel, and lodging.
  • You will be prioritized for a kidney donation in the unlikely event that you need a kidney transplant in the future.
  • You can receive mentoring from a living kidney donor.

The National Kidney Registry’s Donor Shield and the National Kidney Donation Organization provide resources and supports to living kidney donors. And EMS Gives Life will be with you, every step of the way!

Sign Up to be a Kidney Donor for Kelly

Take the first step to start the screening process and request a mentor.  There is no commitment to exploring the idea of being a kidney donor.

Click here

Learn More about Kidney Donation

Click here to learn more about living kidney donation, donor resources, and best practice approaches to donating your kidney to a specific recipient.

NHTSA Names New 911 Program Coordinator

Please see the following statement from NHTSA announcing their newly named 911 Program Coordinator
911 program coordinator

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA) Office of Emergency Medical Services announced today that Brian Tegtmeyer, ENP (Emergency Number Professional) will assume the role of National 911 Program Coordinator effective May 9, 2022. 

Mr. Tegtmeyer brings more than 26 years of experience in the field of public safety communications to the position.

“NHTSA’s long-term commitment to supporting 911 systems continues with the selection of Brian as the new coordinator for the National 911 Program,” said Gam Wijetunge, Director of the Office of EMS. “His deep knowledge of 911 systems and history of working within the 911 community, at a state, regional and national level is the experience needed to collaborate on updating and improving 911 across the nation.”

Brian began his career as a dispatcher at Hazel Crest Illinois Police Department and continued serving in various leadership roles in 911 systems before assuming his most recent position as Executive Director of DuPage Public Safety Communications in 2007. There he managed a 911 center with 44 agencies that serves a population of over 850,000 citizens.

“Next Generation 911 is the future of public safety communications. This evolution will impact every aspect of a communications center from the technology to operations to our most valuable resource—our telecommunicators,” said Tegtmeyer. “I am excited to join the National 911 Program’s efforts to help state and local 911 systems provide optimal 911 services to their communities.”

Brian has spent over a decade as a national educator teaching Public Safety Telecommunicator courses. He has also been an active member of multiple public safety organizations, including the National Emergency Number Association (NENA), the Association of Public Safety Communications Officials (APCO) and has been active in Telecommunicator Emergency Response Taskforces (TERT) on a state and national level.

Brian earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminal Justice and Sociology at Western Michigan University and also served as a firefighter-EMT at the start of his career.

EMS Gives Life | Help EMT Dave Find His Wife Kelly a Kidney

Help Firefighter EMT Dave Find his wife Kelly a Kidney

Help Firefighter EMT Dave Raymond find a Kidney for his wife Kelly

Dave Raymond is asking you to help him save the life of his wife, Kelly! Kelly needs a kidney transplant to live. Both Dave and their son, Christopher, are firefighter EMTs. They are committed to saving people’s lives every day. The hardest thing in the world is not being able to save Kelly on their own.  Now Dave is turning to the community and his fire service/EMS family to ask for help.

A Message from Dave Raymond

My name is Dave Raymond and my lovely wife is Kelly. I’m a Lieutenant on the Hamilton (MA) Fire Department and an EMT/ESO Manager for Cataldo Ambulance. Kelly and I have been married for 27 years and are proud parents of a son, Christopher, who is also a firefighter EMT for Hamilton Fire. Our family has a strong history of community involvement and a dedication to helping others. We are blessed with a great family and friends who are of tremendous support. Like all families, we have had obstacles to overcome and we’ve always figured it out. When Kelly’s kidneys started to fail and she was placed on the transplant waiting list in 2020, I really thought I would be her donor and everything would be okay. I have since learned that I’m not medically eligible to be a kidney donor. I never thought I would be asking for this type of help from friends, acquaintances, and even strangers, but here I am, asking for someone to be a kidney donor for my wife, Kelly. I need help to save her!

Kelly’s Medical History of Diabetes and Kidney Disease

Kelly has struggled with medical issues all her life. She has Type 1 (Juvenile) Diabetes which created many health complications. But one by one, Kelly has overcome and moved on, keeping an incredibly optimistic outlook. In 2013 she lost her leg to diabetes but has adapted very well. In 2020 her kidneys started shutting down rapidly and it was determined that she would need a kidney transplant to live. In the meantime, Kelly is doing dialysis 7 days a week to keep going. It is difficult, but we are grateful that dialysis buys her some time while we search for a donor. Many people have stepped up for Kelly and all but one has been found medically ineligible to donate. Unfortunatley the one approved donor had a major family crisis that put kidney donation on hold indefinitely. We are continuing to fight for Kelly and we know that someone will see our story and volunteer to help. When you and your family are used to helping others, it is the hardest thing to do to ask for help – but I’m asking.

“I want my mom to feel better and live without constant sickness.”

– Christopher Raymond, son, Firefighter EMT

Becoming a Kidney Donor for Kelly

This is the most important thing to know – you do not need to be a match to be a kidney donor for Kelly! If you are healthy enough to be a kidney donor, you can donate on Kelly’s behalf. Through the National Kidney Registry’s standard voucher program, you can donate a kidney to someone who is the best match to you. And because of your donation, you can give Kelly a voucher that will take her from the 100,000-person national waiting list to a National Kidney Registry living donor list. They will find her a match typically in months, instead of years. But she is only eligible for the living donor list if someone donates a kidney on her behalf. That’s why we need you.

Important Information for Potential Donors

  • Kelly is a patient at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston which is a National Kidney Registry (NKR) member center.
  • You do not need to be a match to be a kidney donor for Kelly. If you are healthy and eligible to donate a kidney, your donation can provide Kelly with a voucher that prioritizes her for a kidney donation that is her best match.
  • You do not need to come to Boston to donate a kidney on Kelly’s behalf. You can be evaluated and donate through any of the National Kidney Registry’s 100 member centers nationwide.
  • One healthy kidney can do the work of two and donors can live a full, healthy life with only one kidney. Kidney transplant surgery is very safe with a short hospital stay and fairly quick recovery times.
  • There is no financial burden for donors. Kelly’s insurance pays for all medical testing, evaluation, and surgery. NKR’s Donor Shield program provides reimbursement for lost wages, travel, and lodging.
  • There are supports and protections available for living donors as well as mentoring by someone who has been a living kidney donor. In the unlikely event that a kidney donor needs a kidney transplant in the future, they will be prioritized on the living donor list.
  • EMS Gives Life will provide support to potential donors, from considering donation through the donation process.
  • There is no commitment to learn more.
  • All inquiries are held in complete confidence by EMS Gives Life.

Would you consider being Kelly’s kidney donor?

Good news…

You don’t need to be an exact match to be a donor for Kelly!

If you’re healthy enough to donate a kidney, you can be a donor on Kelly’s behalf!

  • You can do testing, evaluation, and surgery at a hospital close to home and on your schedule.
  • You will get cost reimbursement for lost wages, travel, and lodging.
  • You will be prioritized for a kidney donation in the unlikely event that you need a kidney transplant in the future.
  • You can receive mentoring from a living kidney donor.

The National Kidney Registry’s Donor Shield and the National Kidney Donation Organization provide resources and supports to living kidney donors. And EMS Gives Life will be with you, every step of the way!

Sign Up to be a Kidney Donor for Kelly

Take the first step to start the screening process and request a mentor.  There is no commitment to exploring the idea of being a kidney donor.

Click here

Learn More about Kidney Donation

Click here to learn more about living kidney donation, donor resources, and best practice approaches to donating your kidney to a specific recipient.

Ukraine Relief | OSF Healthcare System

OSF Healthcare System of Peoria, Illinois, is working to organize donations of medical supplies and retired ambulances for Ukraine. Most recently, they were able to send 350 pallets of cargo in addition to an ambulance to assist.

If your organization would like to participate, please reach out to Christopher Manson, Vice President of Government Relations, at Christopher.M.Manson@osfhealthcare.org.

Our thoughts are with all those impacted by this tragic conflict.

 

Ukraine Relief | OSF Healthcare System

OSF Healthcare System of Peoria, Illinois, is working to organize donations of medical supplies and retired ambulances for Ukraine. Most recently, they were able to send 350 pallets of cargo in addition to an ambulance to assist.

If your organization would like to participate, please reach out to Christopher Manson, Vice President of Government Relations, at Christopher.M.Manson@osfhealthcare.org.

Our thoughts are with all those impacted by this tragic conflict.

 

Brave of Heart Scholarship

The Brave of Heart Fund was founded in May 2020 by the Foundations of Cigna and New York Life and administered by E4E Relief. It was established to provide charitable grants and emotional support services to families of frontline healthcare workers, volunteers, and support staff whose lives were lost in the fight against COVID-19.

Now, the Brave of Heart Fund continues to honor the hard work and sacrifice of healthcare workers and their families via scholarship funding for their spouses, domestic partners, and children.

Applications are now being accepted online.

Up to $25,000.00 annually is available in scholarship funding, depending on an eligible applicant’s academic focus, student status, and other criteria.

Eligible Applicants

  • Must be a spouse, domestic partner, or child of a healthcare worker, volunteer, or support staff whose life was lost in the fight against COVID-19.
  • Must plan to enroll in accredited studies at the undergraduate or graduate levels, in community college, or in vocational and technical schools.
  • May be non-traditional students and individuals enrolled in part-time coursework.
  • Do not have to be previous recipients of Brave of Heart Fund grants; recipients of previous grant funding are also still eligible.

Application Deadline

For Fall 2022 semester scholarships:
April 20, 2022

3:00PM Central Standard Time

HRSA eNews | Expanding Health Care Access and Resources in Underserved Populations,

HRSA eNews March 3, 2022

March 3, 2022

Administrator Carole Johnson on HRSA’s Commitment to President Biden’s National Mental Health Strategy

douglas-emhoff-carole-johnson-nationwide-childrens-hospitalIn his State of the Union address, President Biden announced an ambitious strategy to address our national mental health crisis. At the Health Resources and Services Administration, we stand with the President in his call for unity in our national response and know that for the millions of Americans living with a mental health condition or caring for a loved one with a mental health condition, the time for action is now.

Yesterday, Administrator Johnson and HRSA Chief of Staff Jordan Grossman joined the Second Gentleman Mr. Emhoff and Assistant Secretary for Health Admiral Levine in Columbus, Ohio, to visit HRSA grantees addressing youth mental health care needs and providing mental health supports for the health care workforce.

Read Administrator Johnson’s full statement on the President’s National Mental Health Strategy.


HRSA Works to Expand Health Care Access and Resources in Underserved Populations

physicianIn February, HRSA announced the winners of the Promoting Pediatric Primary Prevention Challenge, $66.5 million to support community-based vaccine outreach efforts, more than $560 million in pandemic relief payments to health care providers, funding to increase virtual care quality and access, and new funding to support primary care residency programs.

Read our announcements.


HHS Distributing $560 Million in Provider Relief Fund Payments to Health Care Providers Affected by the COVID-19 Pandemic

Clipart of health professionalsWith this funding, nearly $19 billion will have been distributed from the Provider Relief Fund and the American Rescue Plan Rural provider funding since November 2021 

February 24 – The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), through the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), is making more than $560 million in Provider Relief Fund (PRF) Phase 4 General Distribution payments to more than 4,100 providers across the country this week.

“Provider Relief Funds have been living up to its name, providing much-needed relief to our nation’s health care providers,” said Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra. “From expanding life-saving services to tackling workforce challenges, these funds will continue to help weather the pandemic’s continued impact. The Biden-Harris Administration remain committed to ensuring our providers with the necessary support and tools to keep our families safer and healthier.”

Read the press release.


National Health Service Corps: 50 Years of Commitment, Compassion and Community

nhsc anniversary social media cardOur National Health Service Corps (NHSC) is gearing up to celebrate its 50th anniversary, and you’re invited to join in. Established with the Emergency Health Personnel Act of 1970, the NHSC placed its first clinicians – which included physicians, dentists and nurses – in 20 communities in 13 states. Learn how you can engage with, promote, and celebrate this historic milestone with our largest class of participants yet!


New Report on Children’s Mental Health Features Key Data from National Survey of Children’s Health

children lined upnew report featuring data from HRSA’s 2016-2019 National Survey of Children’s Health, shows that children’s mental health was a substantial public health concern even before the COVID-19 pandemic started.

This report is an update to one first published in 2013 in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. The 2013 report was the first ever cross-agency children’s mental health surveillance report, and includes input from HRSA, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and the National Institute of Mental Health. HRSA’s Reem Ghandour and Jesse Lichstein are co-authors.

The current report found that attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and anxiety among children of all ages, and symptoms related to depression among adolescents, are the most common concerns. It also features data on behavioral problems, autism, Tourette syndrome, as well as treatment received and signs that children are doing well. The report concludes that we need further research on positive indicators of mental health such as emotional well-being and resilience to provide the fullest picture of children’s mental health.


Climate Change and Health: The Risks to Community Health and Health Care Utilization

climate change Climate change influences human health and diseases in numerous ways. Underserved communities stand to bear the brunt of these climate-induced risks (e.g., extreme heat, poor air quality, flooding, extreme weather events). HRSA and CDC’s Climate and Health Program invite you to consider the impacts of climate change on the U.S. health care system. CDC will share its work to build resilience to these public health effects.

Webinar Date: Thursday, March 17, 1-2 p.m. ET. 

Register.


Patient Safety Awareness Week Event: Harnessing Individual Power to Effect Positive Change

webcast iconPatient Safety Awareness Week is March 13-19. We are hosting an event in partnership with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Indian Health Service (IHS), and the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Amelia Brooks from Safe and Reliable Healthcare will provide strategies that health care organizations can implement immediately to improve the safety culture in their organizations. She will share:

  • How to focus on safety in the context of global health and staffing crises
  • How to reduce burdens on frontline providers
  • Implementing practical strategies to support staff

There will also be a virtual exhibit hall at the end of the session.

Webinar Date: Thursday, March 17, 2-3:30 p.m. ET. 

Register.


States Take Action to Address Children’s Mental Health in Schools

teens against locker in schoolChildren’s mental health continues to be a top priority for state leaders across both legislative and executive branches of state government. With COVID-19 exacerbating the challenges children are facing, there is much more work to be done.

This National Academy for State Health Policy (NASHP) blog post summarizes the actions many states have taken from March 2020 through December 2021 to support school mental health systems, while many more states continue to consider legislation during the 2022 session.

HRSA’s National Organizations of State and Local Officials Cooperative Agreement provided support for this blog post.


image of a calendar

March

  • National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month
  • National Poison Prevention Week (20-26)
  • National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (10)
  • National Native American HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (20)
  • National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week (21-27)

Funding Opportunities

 

Health Workforce


Dental Faculty Loan Repayment Program – apply by March 22

Teaching Health Center Graduate Medical Education (THCGME) Program – apply by March 31

Area Health Education Centers Program – apply by April 6

State Loan Repayment Program (SLRP) – apply by April 8

Health Workforce Research Center Cooperative Agreement Program – apply by April 14

HIV/AIDS Bureau


Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Part F Dental Reimbursement Program – apply by March 11

Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Part D Coordinated HIV Services and Access to Research for Women, Infants, Children, and Youth (WICY) Limited Existing Geographic Service Areas – apply by March 31

Telehealth Strategies to Maximize HIV Care – apply by April 8

Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Part B States/Territories Supplemental Grant Program – apply by May 9

Maternal and Child Health


Enhancing Systems of Care for Children with Medical Complexity (Coordinating Center) – apply by March 7

Enhancing Systems of Care for Children with Medical Complexity (Demonstration Projects) – apply by March 7

Maternal and Child Environmental Health Network (MCEHN) – apply by March 28

MCH Adolescent and Young Adult Health Research Network (AYAH-RN) – apply by March 29

Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs Research Network – apply by April 4

Autism Single Investigator Innovation Program (Autism-SIIP) – Autism Transitions Research Project (ATRP) – apply by April 4

Autism Single Investigator Innovation Program (Autism-SIIP) – Autism Longitudinal Data Project (ALDP) – apply by April 4

American Rescue Plan Act – Pediatric Mental Health Care Access – New Area Expansion – apply by April 5

Home Visiting Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network 3.0 (HV CoIIN 3.0) – apply by April 6

Autism CARES Act National Interdisciplinary Training Resource Center – apply by April 7

Catalyst for Infant Health Equity – apply by April 19

Infant-Toddler Court Program – National Resource Center – apply by May 4

Infant-Toddler Court Program – State Awards – apply by May 4

Early Childhood Developmental Health Systems: Evidence to Impact – apply by May 10

Federal Office of Rural Health Policy


Medicare Rural Hospital Flexibility Program- Emergency Medical Services Competing Supplement – apply by March 4

Rural Health and Economic Development Analysis – apply by March 8

Rural Communities Opioid Response Program-Behavioral Health Care Technical Assistance – apply by March 9

Rural Public Health Workforce Training Network Program – apply by March 18

Small Health Care Provider Quality Improvement Program – apply by March 21

Rural Maternity and Obstetrics Management Strategies Program – apply by April 5

Rural Communities Opioid Response Program – Behavioral Health Care Support – apply by April 19


View All Funding Opportunities

EMS Gives Life | EMT Reid Needs a Living Kidney Donor

URGENT:  Fellow first responder Reid Cappel is in kidney failure and needs a kidney transplant.  A living donor is his best chance at survival. 


For years, Reid Cappel has selflessly served his New Jersey community as an emergency medical technician. Now, it is his turn to ask for a lifeline from his fellow public health and public safety professionals. Help Reid find a living kidney donor, so that he can get back to doing what he does best: caring for others.

Anyone who is healthy and eligible to be a kidney donor can give Reid the gift of life.  A donor does not have to be a direct match, can live anywhere in the US, and will have access to donor protections and resources.  EMS Gives Life, a nonprofit organization for first responders, by first responders, will provide guidance to our EMS, fire, and police brethren who are considering living donation.

All inquiries will be held in complete confidence.  There is no commitment required to learn more.  Meet Reid and learn more about living kidney donation at  www.emsgiveslife.org/Reid.

 

FAIR Health | Ground Ambulance Services in the United States

From FAIR Health in February 2022

“Currently, no federal law protects consumers against “surprise” bills from out-of-network ground ambulance providers. Some state and local governments regulate ground ambulance surprise billing practices; however, such laws may not apply to all health plans or ambulance providers in an area. Because of the substantial policy interest in ground ambulance services, FAIR Health drew on its vast database of private healthcare claims to illuminate multiple aspects of such services across the nation, including utilization, costs, age, gender, diagnoses and differences across states.”

Download PDF Report

Lights & Siren Vehicle Operations on Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Responses

Joint Statement on Lights & Siren Vehicle Operations on Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Responses

February 14, 2022

Douglas F. Kupas, Matt Zavadsky, Brooke Burton, Shawn Baird, Jeff J. Clawson, Chip Decker, Peter Dworsky, Bruce Evans, Dave Finger, Jeffrey M. Goodloe, Brian LaCroix, Gary G. Ludwig, Michael McEvoy, David K. Tan, Kyle L. Thornton, Kevin Smith, Bryan R. Wilson

Download PDF Position Statement

The National Association of EMS Physicians and the then National Association of State EMS Directors created a position statement on emergency medical vehicle use of lights and siren in 1994 (1). This document updates and replaces this previous statement and is now a joint position statement with the Academy of International Mobile Healthcare Integration, American Ambulance Association, American College of Emergency Physicians, Center for Patient Safety, International Academies of Emergency Dispatch, International Association of EMS Chiefs, International Association of Fire Chiefs, National Association of EMS Physicians, National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians, National Association of State EMS Officials, National EMS Management Association, National EMS Quality Alliance, National Volunteer Fire Council and Paramedic Chiefs of Canada.

In 2009, there were 1,579 ambulance crash injuries (2), and most EMS vehicle crashes occur when driving with lights and siren (L&S) (3). When compared with other similar-sized vehicles, ambulance crashes are more often at intersections, more often at traffic signals, and more often with multiple injuries, including 84% involving three or more people (4).

From 1996 to 2012, there were 137 civilian fatalities and 228 civilian injuries resulting from fire service vehicle incidents and 64 civilian fatalities and 217 civilian injuries resulting from ambulance incidents. According to the

U.S. Fire Administration (USFA), 179 firefighters died as the result of vehicle crashes from 2004 to 2013 (5). The National EMS Memorial Service reports that approximately 97 EMS practitioners were killed in ambulance collisions from 1993 to 2010 in the United States (6).

Traffic-related fatality rates for law enforcement officers, firefighters, and EMS practitioners are estimated to be 2.5 to 4.8 times higher than the national average among all occupations (7). In a recent survey of 675 EMS practitioners, 7.7% reported being involved in an EMS vehicle crash, with 100% of those occurring in clear weather and while using L&S. 80% reported a broadside strike as the type of MVC (8). Additionally, one survey found estimates of approximately four “wake effect” collisions (defined as collisions caused by, but not involving the L&S operating emergency vehicle) for every crash involving an emergency vehicle (9).

For EMS, the purpose of using L&S is to improve patient outcomes by decreasing the time to care at the scene or to arrival at a hospital for additional care, but only a small percentage of medical emergencies have better outcomes from L&S use. Over a dozen studies show that the average time saved with L&S response or transport ranges from 42 seconds to 3.8 minutes. Alternatively, L&S response increases the chance of an EMS vehicle crash by 50% and almost triples the chance of crash during patient transport (11). Emergency vehicle crashes cause delays to care and injuries to patients, EMS practitioners, and the public. These crashes also increase emergency vehicle resource use through the need for additional vehicle responses, have long-lasting effects on the reputation of an emergency organization, and increases stress and anxiety among emergency services personnel.

Despite these alarming statistics, L&S continue to be used in 74% of EMS responses, and 21.6% of EMS transports, with a wide variation in L&S use among agencies and among census districts in the United States (10).

Although L&S response is currently common to medical calls, few (6.9%) of these result in a potentially lifesaving intervention by emergency practitioners (12). Some agencies have used an evidence-based or quality improvement approach to reduce their use of L&S during responses to medical calls to 20-33%, without any discernable harmful effect on patient outcome. Additionally, many EMS agencies transport very few patients to the hospital with L&S.

Emergency medical dispatch (EMD) protocols have been proven to safely and effectively categorize requests for medical response by types of call and level of medical acuity and urgency. Emergency response agencies have successfully used these EMD categorizations to prioritize the calls that justify a L&S response. Physician medical oversight, formal quality improvement programs, and collaboration with responding emergency services agencies to understand outcomes is essential to effective, safe, consistent, and high-quality EMD.

The sponsoring organizations of this statement believe that the following principles should guide L&S use during emergency vehicle response to medical calls and initiatives to safely decrease the use of L&S when appropriate:

  • The primary mission of the EMS system is to provide out-of-hospital health care, saving lives and improving patient outcomes, when possible, while promoting safety and health in communities. In selected time-sensitive medical conditions, the difference in response time with L&S may improve the patient’s
  • EMS vehicle operations using L&S pose a significant risk to both EMS practitioners and the public. Therefore, during response to emergencies or transport of patients by EMS, L&S should only be used for situations where the time saved by L&S operations is anticipated to be clinically important to a patient’s outcome. They should not be used when returning to station or posting on stand-by
  • Communication centers should use EMD programs developed, maintained, and approved by national standard-setting organizations with structured call triage and call categorization to identify subsets of calls based upon response resources needed and medical urgency of the call. Active physician medical oversight is critical in developing response configurations and modes for these EMD protocols. These programs should be closely monitored by a formal quality assurance (QA) program for accurate use and response outcomes, with such QA programs being in collaboration with the EMS agency physician medical
  • Responding emergency agencies should use response based EMD categories and other local policies to further identify and operationalize the situations where L&S response or transport are clinically Response agencies should use these dispatch categories to prioritize expected L&S response modes. The EMS agency physician medical director and QA programs must be engaged in developing these agency operational policies/guidelines.
  • Emergency response agency leaderships, including physician medical oversight and QA personnel should monitor the rates of use, appropriateness, EMD protocol compliance, and medical outcomes related to L&S use during response and patient
  • Emergency response assignments based upon approved protocols should be developed at the local/department/agency level. A thorough community risk assessment, including risk reduction analysis, should be conducted, and used in conjunction with local physician medical oversight to develop and establish safe response
  • All emergency vehicle operators should successfully complete a robust initial emergency vehicle driver training program, and all operators should have required regular continuing education on emergency vehicle driving and appropriate L&S
  • Municipal government leaders should be aware of the increased risk of crashes associated with L&S response to the public, emergency responders, and patients. Service agreements with emergency medical response agencies can mitigate this risk by using tiered response time expectations based upon EMD categorization of calls. Quality care metrics, rather than time metrics, should drive these contract
  • Emergency vehicle crashes and near misses should trigger clinical and operational QA reviews. States and provinces should monitor and report on emergency medical vehicle crashes for better understanding of the use and risks of these warning devices.
  • EMS and fire agency leaders should work to understand public perceptions and expectations regarding L&S use. These leaders should work toward improving public education about the risks of L&S use to create safer expectations of the public and government

In most settings, L&S response or transport saves less than a few minutes during an emergency medical response, and there are few time-sensitive medical emergencies where an immediate intervention or treatment in those minutes is lifesaving. These time-sensitive emergencies can usually be identified through utilization of high-quality dispatcher call prioritization using approved EMD protocols. For many medical calls, a prompt response by EMS practitioners without L&S provides high-quality patient care without the risk of L&S-related crashes. EMS care is part of the much broader spectrum of acute health care, and efficiencies in the emergency department, operative, and hospital phases of care can compensate for any minutes lost with non-L&S response or transport.

Sponsoring Organizations and Representatives:

Academy of International Mobile Healthcare Integration
American Ambulance Association
American College of Emergency Physicians
Center for Patient Safety
International Academies of Emergency Dispatch
International Association of EMS Chiefs
International Association of Fire Chiefs
National Association of EMS Physicians
National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians
National Association of State EMS Officials
National EMS Management Association
National EMS Quality Alliance
National Volunteer Fire Council


References:

  1. Use of warning lights and siren in emergency medical vehicle response and patient transport. Prehosp and Disaster Med. 1994;9(2):133-136.
  2. Grant CC, Merrifield Analysis of ambulance crash data. The Fire Protection Research Foundation. 2011. Quincy, MA.
  3. Kahn CA, Pirallo RG, Kuhn EM. Characteristics of fatal ambulance crashes in the United States: an 11-year retrospective Prehosp Emerg Care. 2001;5(3):261-269.
  4. Ray AF, Kupas DF. Comparison of crashes involving ambulances with those of similar-sized vehicles. Prehosp Emerg Care. 2005;9(4):412-415.
  5. S. Fire Administration. Firefighter fatalities in the United States in 2013. 2014. Emmitsburg, MD.
  6. Maguire Transportation-related injuries and fatalities among emergency medical technicians and paramedics.

Prehosp Disaster Med. 2011;26(5): 346-352.

  1. Maguire BJ, Hunting KL, Smith GS, Levick Occupational fatalities in emergency medical services: A hidden crisis.

Ann Emerg Med, 2002;40: 625-632.

  1. Drucker C, Gerberich SG, Manser MP, Alexander BH, Church TR, Ryan AD, Becic Factors associated with civilian drivers involved in crashes with emergency vehicles. Accident Analysis & Prevention. 2013; 55:116-23.
  2. Clawson JJ, Martin RL, Cady GA, Maio RF. The wake effect: emergency vehicle-related collisions. Prehosp Disaster Med. 1997; 12 (4):274-277.
  3. Kupas DF. Lights and siren use by emergency medical services: Above all, do no harm. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. 2017. Available online at https://www.ems.gov/pdf/Lights_and_Sirens_Use_by_EMS_May_2017.pdf
  4. Watanabe BL, Patterson GS, Kempema JM, Magailanes O, Brown LH. Is use of warning lights and sirens associated with increased risk of ambulance crashes? A contemporary analysis using national EMS information system (NEMSIS) Ann Emerg Med. 2019;74(1):101-109.
  5. Jarvis JL, Hamilton V, Taigman M, Brown LH. Using red lights and sirens for emergency ambulance response: How often are potentially life-saving interventions performed? Prehosp Emerg Care. 2021; 25(4): 549-555.

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EMS Gives Life | EMT Reid Needs a Living Kidney Donor

URGENT:  Fellow first responder Reid Cappel is in kidney failure and needs a kidney transplant.  A living donor is his best chance at survival. 


For years, Reid Cappel has selflessly served his New Jersey community as an emergency medical technician. Now, it is his turn to ask for a lifeline from his fellow public health and public safety professionals. Help Reid find a living kidney donor, so that he can get back to doing what he does best: caring for others.

Anyone who is healthy and eligible to be a kidney donor can give Reid the gift of life.  A donor does not have to be a direct match, can live anywhere in the US, and will have access to donor protections and resources.  EMS Gives Life, a nonprofit organization for first responders, by first responders, will provide guidance to our EMS, fire, and police brethren who are considering living donation.

All inquiries will be held in complete confidence.  There is no commitment required to learn more.  Meet Reid and learn more about living kidney donation at  www.emsgiveslife.org/Reid.

 

EMT Reid Needs a Kidney! Living Donor Sought

URGENT:  Fellow first responder Reid Cappel is in kidney failure and needs a kidney transplant.  A living donor is his best chance at survival. 


For years, Reid Cappel has selflessly served his New Jersey community as an emergency medical technician. Now, it is his turn to ask for a lifeline from his fellow public health and public safety professionals. Help Reid find a living kidney donor, so that he can get back to doing what he does best: caring for others.

Anyone who is healthy and eligible to be a kidney donor can give Reid the gift of life.  A donor does not have to be a direct match, can live anywhere in the US, and will have access to donor protections and resources.  EMS Gives Life, a nonprofit organization for first responders, by first responders, will provide guidance to our EMS, fire, and police brethren who are considering living donation.

All inquiries will be held in complete confidence.  There is no commitment required to learn more.  Meet Reid and learn more about living kidney donation at  www.emsgiveslife.org/Reid.

 

NHTSA Names New Office of EMS Director

From NHTSA on January 13, 2022

Long-time OEMS Staff member assumes leadership role

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) today announced that Gamunu Wijetunge, NRP, will assume the role of Director of the Office of EMS effective January, 29, 2022.

Gamunu “Gam” Wijetunge, who has worked within NHTSA’s Office of EMS for more than 20 years, is also a volunteer paramedic, fire captain and the president
of a volunteer rescue squad in Maryland. He will assume the director role — which is also responsible for the National 911 Program housed within the Office of EMS — following the retirement of Jon Krohmer, M.D., FACEP, FAEMS.

“For many years, Gam has been a leader within NHTSA’s Office of EMS, an
advocate for clinicians, and a trusted colleague for both Federal partners and Fire/EMS organizations,” said Dr. Krohmer. “His commitment to collaboration within the EMS community may be best illustrated through his stewardship of EMS Agenda 2050, which sets a clear path for the continued improvement of people-centered EMS systems for the next 30 years.”

Throughout his tenure at NHTSA, Gam has played an integral collaborative role in the development of EMS systems nationwide. These include leading efforts to:

  • Develop evidence-based guidelines and tackle EMS system improvement issues
  • Address recruiting, retention, clinician safety and other EMS workforce topics
  • Improve national EMS preparedness through coordination with other Federal agencies
  • Facilitate consensus and collaboration within leadership and working groups of the Federal Interagency Committee on EMS (FICEMS).

“I am thrilled to continue the office’s collaborative work side-by-side with our Federal partners, EMS stakeholders nationwide, and my colleagues at NHTSA,” said Gam. “I look forward to continuing Jon’s good work to support state, regional and local EMS and 911 agencies as we strive to advance our people-centered EMS and 911 systems.”

Wijetunge has a Bachelors’ Degree in Emergency Health Services from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and a Master of Public Management from the University of Maryland, College Park. He has several professional affiliations and has been recognized repeatedly for outstanding performance and federal service, including most recently the HHS/ASPR COVID-19 Pandemic Civilian Service Medal in 2021.

Colorado | What it’s like in the day of a Denver Health paramedic

From KDVR on January 3, 2022

DENVER (KDVR) — Denver Health paramedics are often first on the scene of an emergency. And when seconds matter, they make life or death decisions.

FOX31 joined them on a ride-along to see how they do their jobs and how they are holding up during the pandemic.

If you need help, Denver Health paramedics are just minutes away.

Continue Reading on KDVR

EMS1 | 2021 EMS Trend Report

From EMS1

The 2021 EMS Trend Report, produced in collaboration with Fitch & Associates and the National EMS Management Association, and sponsored by Pulsara, continues our effort to identify how those in EMS perceive growth, change and the challenges impacting the sustainability and future of the industry.

Last year, we said that 2020 would be a “defining year” for EMS. Even at the time, soon after the emergence of the new coronavirus in the U.S., we didn’t realize how much that might be true. It certainly was a defining year for EMS, for healthcare and for the entire global community.

A year later, the long-term impacts of the pandemic on our profession remain uncertain. What we do know is how the pandemic highlighted the adaptability of EMS. The sixth annual EMS Trend Report dives into the impact COVID-19 had, and didn’t have, the changes we’re embracing and the change providers want to see, as we explore the opinions, concerns and hopes of your colleagues across EMS at this critical moment in history.

Download your copy to read:

  • The state of the profession: The more things change, the more they stay the same
  • Roundtable: Incremental change through transformative events
  • Is poor leadership more dangerous than a pandemic?
  • Why EMS systems that scale represent the future of EMS
  • 8 Places to invest in provider safety

Download on EMS1

In Memory of Larry Stone

From The Boston Globe

STONE, Lawrence W. “Larry” Founder and President of PRO EMS Ambulance of Cambridge Passed away at Massachusetts General Hospital on October 9th. He was 75. Raised in Somerville, he was the son of the late John and Frances (Nichols) Stone. Larry served in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War. Upon his return from the war, Larry embarked on a long career in public safety and medical service, founding Professional Ambulance & Oxygen Service in 1969. Today, PRO EMS continues to proudly service the City of Cambridge and surrounding areas. During his years as President of the company he oversaw its steady expansion and navigated the increasing scope of services that emergency medicine provided. He was a leader in the development of inter-agency response to mass casualty events and could always be relied upon in the public safety community for rendering sound advice, born from the breath and length of his experience. Known as “225” to his colleagues and friends, Larry continued to be the driving force and conscience of his company. He has been featured in articles of the Journal of Emergency Medical Services and the Boston Globe. Larry was active in professional associations and civic affairs. He was a long time member and Past Commander of Cambridge VFW Post 299. The beloved husband of Catherine A. “Cathy” (Leonard) Stone, Larry was a devoted father to Teresa Cruz and her husband Edwin of Burlington, Danielle Santiago and her husband Javier of Billerica, and Kelly Stone-Pantojas and her husband Alex “Big Al” of Burlington. He was a loving Papa to Anthony, Ariana, Victoria, Xavier and Sofia. He was the brother of Francis, Jean, John, Sandra and Norman. He also leaves many nieces and nephews. Relatives and friends are respectfully invited to visit at the Dello Russo Funeral Home on Thursday, October 14th from 4 through 8 PM and again on Friday at 10 AM followed by a funeral Mass celebrated in St. John the Evangelist Church, 2270 Mass. Ave., Cambridge at 11 AM. As an expression of sympathy, memorial contributions may be sent in Larry’s name to the Vietnam Veterans of America, 8719 Colesville Road, Suite 100, Silver Spring, Maryland 20910. To leave a message of condolence, visit www.dellorusso.net

View the online memorial for Lawrence W. “Larry” STONE

American Ambulance Association 2021 Award Winners Announced

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Media Contact
Amanda Riordan
media@ambulance.org

 AMERICAN AMBULANCE ASSOCIATION ANNOUNCES 2021 AWARD WINNERS

Washington, DC, October 5, 2021—Shawn Baird, President of the American Ambulance Association (AAA), announced the 2021 Award Winners at the AAA board meeting on September 21st.  The awardees are as follows:

Affiliate of the Year

  • The Mercury Group – for their strategic outreach shining the light and attention on the role that EMS plays in the pandemic.
  • Sellers Dorsey – for their efforts in support of state Medicaid supplemental payments for EMS providers.

Partnership of the Year

  • International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC), International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF), and the National Association of EMTs (NAEMT) for their collaboration throughout the pandemic on both legislative and regulatory issues.

Distinguished Service Award

  • Jon Krohmer, Director, NHTSA’s Office of EMS – for his tireless efforts during the Public Health Emergency (PHE).
  • Maria Bianchi, AAA Chief Executive Officer – for her unwavering dedication and leadership through a global pandemic.

President’s Award

  • Asbel Montes, Acadian Ambulance Service, Lafayette, Louisiana for his leadership on ground ambulance policies, future payment reform initiatives, and balance billing.

Robert L Forbuss Lifetime Achievement Award

  • Josef (Joe) Penner, Medic (Mecklenburg EMS Agency) for his decades of service, leadership, and vision in EMS.

Walter J. Schaefer Award

  • Rachel Harracksingh, Life Ambulance, El Paso, Texas for her leadership, guidance, and tenacity in growing AAA’s political outreach and presence on Capitol Hill.

The Awards will be presented at the AAA Annual Conference and Trade Show President’s Reception on Tuesday, November 2, 2021, at the Gaylord Hotel in Grapevine Texas.


About the American Ambulance Association

The American Ambulance Association safeguards the future of mobile healthcare through advocacy, thought leadership, and education. AAA advances sustainable EMS policy, empowering our members to serve their communities with high-quality on-demand healthcare.

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2021 Ambulance Ride-Along Toolkit

AAA ambulance emt member legislation

2021 Ride-Along Toolkit Now Available!

Educating your members of Congress about ambulance industry issues makes them more likely to support our policy efforts. An easy and effective way to educate them is to invite them to participate in a local Ambulance Ride-Along!

Congress has adjourned for summer recess and members have returned home to their districts and states. This is the perfect opportunity for you to educate your members of Congress about our issues, in particular our Medicare Ambulance Bill, Balance Billing, and access to the Provider Relief Fund, which are all essential to your service.

The most effective way to deliver these key messages is to host your member of Congress or their staff on a tour of your operation and an ambulance ride-along. While COVID-19 has made a traditional ride-along difficult, you can still host them for a virtual site visit to show your operation and how you are handling the public health emergency. The AAA has made the process of arranging a ride-long or scheduling a meeting easy for you with our 2021 Congressional Ride-Along Toolkit.

Everything you need to arrange the ride-along or schedule a meeting during this time of social distancing and virtual participation is included in the Toolkit. Act now and invite your elected officials to join you on an Ambulance Ride-Along!