Notice of Proposed Change to OSHA Injury Reporting

Notice of Proposed Change to OSHA Electronic Injury Reporting Regulations The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) announced on July 27, 2018 that it has published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) that would change the Electronic Injury Reporting Regulations (29 CFR Part 1904) for employers with 250 or more employees. OSHA is proposing this change due to a heightened concern that employee Personally Identifiable Information may be at risk of disclosure through the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). Currently, all EMS employers must submit their annual injury and illness data to OSHA through the Injury Tracking Application (ITA). Historically, employers were required to track all workplace injuries and illnesses and maintain records of those incidents in the workplace on the OSHA Form 300, 301, and 300A. Each year, employers are required to post a Summary of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses on the Form 300A from February 1st through April 30th. In May 2016, OSHA amended the regulations requiring all employers to submit their Form 300A Summary electronically through the Injury Tracking Application (ITA). Employers with 250 or more employees were required to electronically report all injury and illness data from Forms 300, 301, and 300A each year. Initially OSHA...

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Confidential support for AAA member organizations

Confidential support for employees of AAA member organizations As first responders, you regularly bear witness to traumatic events, and you directly experience loss, sadness, and sometimes even frightening violence outside the norm of the human experience. Exposure to trauma can cause emotional reactions for weeks or even months following. If you’re struggling to cope with difficult emotions or dealing with symptoms of an acute stress reaction, the American Ambulance Association can help. Confidential counseling from LifeWorks—At no cost to you. LifeWorks is your employee assistance program (EAP) and well-being resource. We’re here for you any time, 24/7, 365 days a year, with expert advice, resources, referrals to counseling, and connections to specialty providers including substance abuse professionals. Toll-free immediate support by phone if you’re in distress. Up to three face-to-face confidential counseling sessions per issue. Counseling live by video to meet clinical needs and preferences. All counselors are experienced therapists with a minimum Master’s degree in psychology, social work, educational counseling, or other social services field. Onsite CISM Services – Round-the-clock support for critical incidents. If your ambulance service has experienced an employee death, severe vehicle accident, staff suicide, or other traumatic event, AAA is here to help. Email info@ambulance.org...

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Data Privacy

This past January, the AAA hosted a webinar presented by EMS/healthcare Attorneys Matthew Streger, Margaret Keavney, and Rebecca Ragkoski, titled Cybersecurity, Top 10 Considerations in Healthcare and How to Address Them. During this very informative webinar, Matt, Margaret, and Rebecca covered one of the biggest issues facing EMS and other healthcare providers today, data security. If you did not get chance to listen in on this program, it is available on-demand at the AAA website. As highlighted in their webinar, data security and data breach concerns are one of the most frequently encountered issues facing EMS agencies as healthcare providers but also as employers. Ensuring that patient and employee protected health information (PHI) and personally identifiable information (PII) is adequately protected from access or intrusion is critically important. Alabama becomes the 50th state to enact data breach requirements for all individuals and businesses in the state. The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) provides a great summary of the new breach requirements in several article resources published this week. The National Conference on State Legislatures is a great resource for learning the laws that apply to your organization. Of course, it is recommended that all members engage a law firm...

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OSHA Injury Reporting

Last year we notified AAA members that they must begin electronically reporting their workplace injury data to OSHA starting December 1, 2017 for 2016. This is just a reminder to all employers can begin electronically reporting their 2017 workplace injury data through the OSHA Injury Tracking Application (ITA). 2017 Injury Data must be submitted to OSHA no later than July 1, 2018. For employers in states that are covered by OSHA approved state level work injury regulations, OSHA has announced on April 30, 2018 that employers in states that have not completed the adoption of a state rule must also report their 2017 injury data through the OSHA ITA. If any member has not set up their account with OSHA on the ITA, we strongly suggest that you do so immediately. The AAA can assist members who need assistance ensuring they are compliant with this reporting requirement....

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OSHA Electronic Injury Reporting Deadline Is Dec 15

Several months ago, we alerted AAA members that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) had announced that it would further delay the deadline for employers to electronically file injury data until December 1, 2017.  With that deadline quickly approaching, we wanted to make sure that our members were prepared and reporting the data correctly. OSHA announced in July that it will be launching the new electronic Injury Tracking Application (ITA) on August 1, 2017.  The new rules are an effort to “nudge” employers to improve safety in the workplace by publishing employee injury data, as reported by employers.  Electronic data reporting would give job candidates and employees the ability to compare potential employers and their safety records.  Currently, most employers are required to record injuries that occur in the workplace, but this data is not easily available to candidates or OSHA itself.  It is anticipated that employers can expect greater investigative and enforcement actions after electronic injury reporting begins. Under the Old & New Rules Every year, ambulance services with 10 or more employees are required to record all workplace injuries that involve medical treatment beyond first aid, days away from work, restricted/transfer of duties, or loss of consciousness. ...

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EMS.gov Ambulance Crash Data

NHTSA’s Office of EMS has partnered with a number of organizations, Federal agencies and U.S. Department of Transportation offices to develop resources that help EMS agencies understand ambulance crashes, transport patients safely, report ambulance and equipment defects and build or buy safer ambulances. Download the ambulance crash infographic► Visit the site today►

OSHA to Launch Electronic Injury Reporting on August 1, 2017

A few weeks ago, we alerted AAA members that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) had announced that it would further delay the deadline for employers to electronically file injury data.  The new rules, which require electronic injury data reporting were originally to take effect on July 1, 2017.  These rules were delayed until this December 1, 2017.  It was believed the requirements, an Obama administration initiative, might never see the light of day under the new administration.  However, OSHA announced Friday that all employers (ambulance providers) who employ twenty or more employees will be able to begin submitting electronic report injury data starting August 1, 2017. OSHA announced Friday that it will be launching the new electronic Injury Tracking Application (ITA) on August 1, 2017.  The new rules are an effort to “nudge” employers to improve safety in the workplace by publishing employee injury data, as reported by employers.  Electronic data reporting would give job candidates and employees the ability to compare potential employers and their safety records.  Currently, most employers are required to record injuries that occur in the workplace, but this data is not easily available to candidates or OSHA itself.  It is anticipated that employers...

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