OSHA Electronic Injury Reporting Deadline Is Dec 15

Several months ago, we alerted AAA members that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) had announced that it would further delay the deadline for employers to electronically file injury data until December 1, 2017.  With that deadline quickly approaching, we wanted to make sure that our members were prepared and reporting the data correctly. OSHA announced in July that it will be launching the new electronic Injury Tracking Application (ITA) on August 1, 2017.  The new rules are an effort to “nudge” employers to improve safety in the workplace by publishing employee injury data, as reported by employers.  Electronic data reporting would give job candidates and employees the ability to compare potential employers and their safety records.  Currently, most employers are required to record injuries that occur in the workplace, but this data is not easily available to candidates or OSHA itself.  It is anticipated that employers can expect greater investigative and enforcement actions after electronic injury reporting begins. Under the Old & New Rules Every year, ambulance services with 10 or more employees are required to record all workplace injuries that involve medical treatment beyond first aid, days away from work, restricted/transfer of duties, or loss of consciousness. ...

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EMS.gov Ambulance Crash Data

NHTSA’s Office of EMS has partnered with a number of organizations, Federal agencies and U.S. Department of Transportation offices to develop resources that help EMS agencies understand ambulance crashes, transport patients safely, report ambulance and equipment defects and build or buy safer ambulances. Download the ambulance crash infographic► Visit the site today►

OSHA to Launch Electronic Injury Reporting on August 1, 2017

A few weeks ago, we alerted AAA members that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) had announced that it would further delay the deadline for employers to electronically file injury data.  The new rules, which require electronic injury data reporting were originally to take effect on July 1, 2017.  These rules were delayed until this December 1, 2017.  It was believed the requirements, an Obama administration initiative, might never see the light of day under the new administration.  However, OSHA announced Friday that all employers (ambulance providers) who employ twenty or more employees will be able to begin submitting electronic report injury data starting August 1, 2017. OSHA announced Friday that it will be launching the new electronic Injury Tracking Application (ITA) on August 1, 2017.  The new rules are an effort to “nudge” employers to improve safety in the workplace by publishing employee injury data, as reported by employers.  Electronic data reporting would give job candidates and employees the ability to compare potential employers and their safety records.  Currently, most employers are required to record injuries that occur in the workplace, but this data is not easily available to candidates or OSHA itself.  It is anticipated that employers...

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EMS Education – A Look Forward

I have always believed EMS parallels the career trajectory of nursing. This is especially true when you look at the infancy of nursing—1750 to 1893—in what was a subservient apprenticeship with no didactic education. “Most nurses working in the States received on-the-job training in hospital diploma schools. Nursing students initially were unpaid, giving hospitals a source of free labor. This created what many nurse historians and policy analysts see as a system that continues to undervalue nursing’s contribution to acute care.” (History Lesson: Nursing Education has evolved over the decades, 2012, para. 5). We reached a turning point in 1893 when the Columbian Exposition met, and although Ms. Florence Nightingale was unavailable to attend, she did have a paper presented at the exposition. In essence, the paper proved that a well-educated nursing workforce with standards of practice was needed to improve the health care of the United States. This is exactly where EMS is now. Young enough to have moved through our growing pains of the late ’60s and early ’70s, but lucky enough to be in an age of extensive medical growth where all levels of providers are looking to enhance the care being provided. So where do we...

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Electronic Injury and Illness Rules Delayed

As reported to members in late May, the United States Department of Labor (DOL) announced that Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) will further delay the implementation of the new Electronic Injury and Illness Rules that were scheduled to go into effect on July 1, 2017. The DOL announced today that they were further delaying the implementation until December 1, 2017. The DOL has stated that the delay is intended to give the agency “further review and consider the rule.”  We will continue to keep members posted of any pending changes to this or any DOL change....

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NHTSA and NASEMSO Host Panel on EMS Practices

The National Association of State EMS Officials (NASEMSO) and the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) hosted a series of meetings for subject matter experts to discuss revisions to the National EMS Scope of Practice model. The experts reviewed the model’s practices, examined education and training procedures, and discussed what certification level, if any, is needed for specific treatments that are now widely-used among EMS professionals. The panel focused on five specific procedures that are commonly practiced: hemorrhage control, Naloxone use, CPAP use, therapeutic hypothermia in cardiac arrest, and pharmacological pain management. Over the next several months, the panel will continue to examine information and recommend changes to the Scope of Practice model, with final recommendations tentatively set to be submitted in August 2018. For more information, please visit NASEMSO’s website.    

REPLICA Compact Enacted

REPLICA Meets Goal, Interstate Compact Becomes Official May 8, 2017 For Immediate Release Contact: Sue Prentiss 603-381-9195 prentiss@emsreplica.org May 8, 2017 (Falls Church, VA). With the 10th member state enactment, the Recognition of Emergency Medical Services Licensure Interstate Compact (REPLICA) has become official. Governor Nathan Deal of Georgia signed Senate Bill 109 on today activating the nation’s first EMS licensure compact. States that have passed REPLICA to date include: Colorado, Texas, Kansas, Virginia, Tennessee, Idaho, Utah, Mississippi, Wyoming and Georgia. Released in 2014, REPLICA’s model legislation creates a formal pathway for the licensed individual to provide pre-hospital care across state lines under authorized circumstances. According to Keith Wages, president of the National Association of State EMS Officials (NASEMSO), “REPLICA represents a collective, nationwide effort to address the problems faced by responders when needing to cross state borders in the line of their duties.” Wages highlighted the compact’s abilities to “increase access to healthcare, reduce regulatory barriers for EMS responders, and place an umbrella of quality over cross border practice not previously seen in the EMS profession.” Wages also noted that the partnership with the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT) has been essential during the advocacy and implementation phases. (more…)

Maintaining Compliance Within an EMS Service

Maintaining compliance within an EMS service can be a daunting task, especially given the number of regulations that we must follow. One way to look at EMS is if a trucking company married a hospital. There are rules and regulations to abide by for an entire fleet of vehicles, from safe operation guidelines all the way down to the use and color of lights. Then there are requirements for a group of healthcare providers, which include necessary certifications such as CPR and knowledge of pertinent life-saving skills. Not only does maintaining compliance keep vehicles and equipment running smoothly, but it can offer employees valuable peace of mind and keep everyone focused on the same goals of providing the best care possible. I like to consider compliance an investment in common sense. Employees know what is expected of them at all times, and they know what type of support their employer will provide to keep their skills sharp. In turn, an EMS service gains from being in good standing with regulators and from an engaged, confident workforce. The benefits of a strong culture of compliance are immense. An organization that lives and breathes compliance can help ensure a smooth-running operation that...

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