CISA: Emergency Services Sector Active Shooter Guide

The FBI designated 28 shootings in 2019 as active shooter incidents. The 28 incidents resulted in 247 casualties, 97 people killed, and 150 people wounded, excluding the shooters. No community appears immune from these potential incidents; therefore, it is important for every community to develop an Active Shooter Program. The purpose of this guide is to provide emergency services personnel with the basic building blocks for developing an Active Shooter Program with communities. This guide highlights resources and planning considerations, which will enhance emergency services organizations’ ability to develop or improve community planning and preparedness for active shooter incidents. For more information, email the Emergency Services Sector-Specific Agency at essteam@cisa.dhs.gov....

This content is available only to AAA members.
Log In or Register

On Demand Presentation: Emergency Medical Services and 911

Healthcare Resilience Task Force: EMS/911 May 29, 2020 Dr. Jon Krohmer, NHTSA, HRTF EMS/Pre-hospital Team Lead Kate Elkins, NHTSA, HRTF EMS/Pre-hospital Deputy Team Lead 911, the universal number to call for emergency help nationwide, is a proven, life-saving service to the public. NHTSA’s Office of EMS oversees the National 911 Program, which envisions an emergency response system that best serves the public, providing immediate help in all emergency situations. This presentation covered the current Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Environment, Impacts and Next Steps for EMS in regards to COVID-19, and EMS and Fire Impacts on Community Lifelines.    

EMS by the Numbers: Impact of COVID-19

May 21, 2020 Presentation by N. Clay Mann PhD, MS, MBA NEMSIS Technical Assistance Center This document is provided by NHTSA in an effort to help State EMS Officials track particular EMS activations occurring during the COVID‐19 pandemic. This document will be updated periodically to provide current information regarding temporal variations in the type and characteristics of EMS activations occurring in the U.S. during the COVID‐19 outbreak. Please contact the NEMSIS Technical Assistance Center for updates to this document. Contact N. Clay Mann at clay.mann@hsc.utah.edu.

FEMA: COVID-19 Guidance for Hurricane Season

FEMA released “COVID-19 Pandemic Operational Guidance for the 2020 Hurricane Season” to help emergency managers and public health officials best prepare for disasters, while continuing to respond to and recover from COVID-19. The guide provides actions emergency managers and public officials can take to prepare for response and recovery operations during ongoing COVID-19 response efforts. Specifically, the guidance: Describes anticipated challenges to disaster operations posed by COVID-19. Highlights planning considerations for emergency managers based on current challenges. Outlines how FEMA plans to adapt response and recovery operations. Creates a shared understanding of expectations between FEMA and emergency managers. Includes guidance, checklists and resources to support emergency managers’ response and recovery planning. Private sector and non-governmental organizations can use the guidance to gain an understanding of the government’s posture, planning and readiness efforts. To expand awareness and understanding of the guidance, FEMA’s National Preparedness Directorate is conducting four webinars. The webinars will allow emergency managers an opportunity to discuss how the guidance can assist jurisdictions review and modify their plans given the constraints and limitations of the ongoing pandemic. To register, please click on the link for the preferred webinar from the list below: Webinar 1: FEMA Adobe Connect 2 – (more…)

EPIC Webinar 5/27: Hurricanes & COVID-19

2020 Hurricane Season During COVID-19 Are you prepared for the 2020 hurricane season while the world is also responding to COVID-19? CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health is joining the CDC EPIC Team Wednesday, May 27, at 1 p.m. EST. CDC experts will discuss possible health risks that could come from hurricanes combined with COVID-19; planning for the 2020 hurricane season while adhering to guidance on social distancing; and how community leaders, nonprofit organizations, and public health professionals can effectively communicate messages. Closed captioning will be available. Click here to learn more about this webinar, including continuing education options. More information on this webinar, previous EPIC webinars, and continuing education can be found on the EPIC Webinar website. Webinar Information When: May 27, 2020 at 1 p.m. ET   Please click the link below to join the webinar: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1614675517 Or iPhone one-tap: US: +16692545252,1614675517# or +16468287666,1614675517# Or Telephone: Dial (for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location): US: +1 669 254 5252 or +1 646 828 7666 Webinar ID: 161 467 5517 International numbers available: https://www.zoomgov.com/u/aedA7dyLM2    

Personal Protective Equipment Supply for Emergency Medical Services (EMS)

Personal Protective Equipment Supply for Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Document Developed by the Healthcare Resilience Task Force Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Prehospital Team.  Download PDF Current Situation Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) supplies, including N-95 respirators and gowns, are in short supply due to the COVID-19 pandemic. These shortages are anticipated to resolve over time as additional sources are identified and manufacturing capacity is expanded. In the interim, Emergency Medical Services (EMS) agencies that are unable to meet their PPE requirements through regular distribution channels are advised to submit requests for PPE supplies through their local and/or state emergency management officials, which are then submitted to Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for sourcing and allocation. Background Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, health care providers are exhausting PPE supplies faster than they can be sourced. EMS agencies are part of the critical infrastructure sector and are strongly considered in the decision-making process to allocate supplies. Actions Taken to Address Supply Issues The Strategic National Stockpile (SNS) has been activated to provide PPE supplies to states for distribution to healthcare agencies. Supplies are being allocated to states on a pro-rata basis for distribution by the state. Initial distributions from the SNS were limited....

This content is available only to AAA members.
Log In or Register

Fentanyl Increasingly Dangerous to First Responders

The explosion of the opioid epidemic that is responsible for thousands of overdoses and deaths is a consistent problem that EMS and law enforcement encounter on an almost daily basis. Usually, the victims of these powerful drugs, such as heroin and fentanyl, are opioid users, who EMS personnel and law enforcement are regularly called to assist. However, first responders are also being warned about the increased risks they face of being exposed to these deadly drugs, specifically fentanyl—a popular synthetic opioid that is 40 to 50 times more powerful than heroin. To respond to these dangers, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) released a field guide called “Fentanyl: A Brief Guide for First Responders” for EMS and police who find themselves responding to opioid-related calls. “We need everybody in the United States to understand how dangerous this is,” Acting DEA Administrator Chuck Rosenberg warned. “Exposure to an amount equivalent to a few grains of sand can kill you.” The warnings have become more urgent in recent months due to numerous cases of accidental overdoses and exposures involving EMS and police. In May, Chris Green, a police officer with the East Liverpool Police Department, was accidentally exposed to fentanyl during a routine traffic stop after he inadvertently ingested the drug through his skin. Green needed four shots (more…)

HHS to Administer $70 million in Funds to Combat Opioid Crisis

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced $70 million in grants to help communities and health care professionals combat the ongoing opioid crisis that is ravaging communities across the U.S. The majority of the money will be used to help prevent opioid-induced deaths and to provide treatment for people with opioid use disorders, including $28 million allotted for medication-based treatment. More than 33,000 lives were claimed in 2015 due to opioid overdoses. $41.7 million of the funding is set to expand resources and training for first responders on how to use emergency treatments, such as Narcan, to help reverse and treat overdoses. In many cases, first responders are often the difference between life and death for opioid users who experience an overdose, so it is imperative health care professionals have access to the needed resources and training to help save lives. The additional funding aims to help paramedics, EMTs and other emergency service personnel gain access to much-needed resources. “The grants we announce today clearly demonstrate our efforts to meet the opioid crisis with every tool at our disposal,” said Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary Kana Enomoto. “The evidence-based training, medication, and behavioral therapies provided here will save lives and help people with addictions (more…)

Cross-Cultural Communication for EMS

Barriers to Understanding In all healthcare settings, successful communication with patients and families depends on awareness of three key barriers to their understanding and compliance: Cultural Barriers: Understanding western medicine and the U.S. healthcare system is a challenge for many of us, but it is especially problematic for recent immigrants and refugees. 72% of U. S. population growth in the next 20 years will come from immigrants, or the children of immigrants. Limited English Proficiency: The number of people who spoke a language other than English at home grew by 38 percent in the 1980s and by 47 percent in the 1990s. While the population aged 5 and over grew by one-fourth from 1980 to 2000, the number who spoke a language other than English at home more than doubled. Low Health Literacy: While poor understanding of the health care system and difficulty understanding health care instructions may be associated with language and cultural barriers, low health literacy is also found in patients who are proficient in English and who share the common U.S. culture. This latter group may be especially at risk of having their low health literacy go unrecognized. 90 million “mainstream” Americans cannot understand basic health information. (more…)