CMS “Pauses” Prior Authorization Model for Scheduled, Repetitive Non-Emergency Ambulance Transportation

CMS released published a guidance document summarizing some of the steps that it has taken to relieve the administrative burden on health care providers and suppliers during the current public health emergency.  As part of that document, CMS indicated that it will be “pausing” the Prior Authorization Model for scheduled, repetitive non-emergency ambulance transports.  Under this program, ambulance suppliers are required to seek and obtain prior authorization for the transportation of repetitive patients beyond the third round-trip in a 30-day period.  Absent prior authorization, claims will be stopped for pre-payment review.  The Prior Authorization Model is currently in place in Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia.

CMS indicated that this pause went into effect as of March 29, 2020, and will continue for as long as the current public health emergency continues.  During this pause, claims for repetitive, scheduled, non-emergency transports will not be stopped for pre-payment review if the prior authorization has not been requested and obtained prior to the fourth round-trip.  However, CMS indicated that claims submitted and paid during the pause without prior authorization will be subject to postpayment review.

CMS further indicated that during this period: (1) the MACs will continue to review any prior authorization requests that have previously been submitted and (2) that ambulance suppliers may continue to submit new prior authorization requests.

Ambulance suppliers in these areas will have to make a business decision on whether to continue to request prior authorization during the current crisis.   Please note that there are significant benefits to obtaining prior authorization for your repetitive patient population.  Specifically, claims that are submitted based on an affirmative prior authorization decision are excluded from future medical review.

The existing Prior Authorization Model is scheduled to expire on December 1, 2020.  CMS has indicated that, at the present time, it does not plan an extension beyond December 1, 2020.  CMS further indicated that the Prior Authorization Model will not be expanded beyond the current states and territories during the public health emergency.

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), coronavirus, COVID-19, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, prior authorization, South Carolina, Virginia, Washington D.C., West Virginia


Brian Werfel

Brian S. Werfel, Esq. is a partner in Werfel & Werfel, PLLC, a New York based law firm specializing in Medicare issues related to the ambulance industry. Brian is a Medicare Consultant to the American Ambulance Association, and has authored numerous articles on Medicare reimbursement, most recently on issues such as the beneficiary signature requirement, repeat admissions and interrupted stays. He is a frequent lecturer on issues of ambulance coverage and reimbursement. Brian is co-author of the AAA’s Medicare Reference Manual for Ambulance, as well as the author of the AAA’s HIPAA Reference Manual. Brian is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and the Columbia School of Law. Prior to joining the firm in 2005, he specialized in mergers & acquisitions and commercial real estate at a prominent New York law firm. Werfel & Werfel, PLLC was founded by David M. Werfel, who has been the Medicare Consultant to the American Ambulance Association for over 20 years.