I have always believed EMS parallels the career trajectory of nursing. This is especially true when you look at the infancy of nursing—1750 to 1893—in what was a subservient apprenticeship with no didactic education. “Most nurses working in the States received on-the-job training in hospital diploma schools. Nursing students initially were unpaid, giving hospitals a source of free labor. This created what many nurse historians and policy analysts see as a system that continues to undervalue nursing’s contribution to acute care.” (History Lesson: Nursing Education has evolved over the decades, 2012, para. 5). We reached a turning point in 1893 when the Columbian Exposition met, and although Ms. Florence Nightingale was unavailable to attend, she did have a paper presented at the exposition. In essence, the paper proved that a well-educated nursing workforce with standards of practice was needed to improve the health care of the United States. This is exactly where EMS is now. Young enough to have moved through our growing pains of the late ’60s and early ’70s, but lucky enough to be in an age of extensive medical growth where all levels of providers are looking to enhance the care being provided. So where do we…

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