AAA Seeks Perspectives on EMS Diversity & Inclusion

As the demographics of our nation change, it becomes ever more essential  for  emergency medical services to foster a  diverse and inclusive workplace more representative of the communities that we serve. To support this mission, the American Ambulance Association seeks tips, ideas, and perspectives from our membership on best practices for attracting, recruiting, and retaining the EMS workforce of tomorrow. For this project, we are using the word “diversity” to refer to characteristics including—but not limited to—race, sex, gender identity, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, socioeconomic class, disability, and/or age. While we are truly appreciative of all responses, AAA especially welcomes the perspectives of those who are themselves members of groups historically less represented in the EMS  workforce. If you would like to contribute your thoughts to this project, please complete our short form below.  You do not need to disclose your identity if you do not wish to do so.  

Spotlight: Desiree Partain, Medstar Mobile Healthcare

Desiree Partain Mobile Integrated Healthcare Manager Medstar Mobile Healthcare Fort Worth, Texas Other Titles & Roles MIH Manager at Large, IBSC, NAEMT member Tell us a little about yourself. Born and raised in sunny San Diego, California. I have a military ( marine grandfather and navy grandfather, brother, and nephew) and first responder (law enforcement mother) family background. Days were spent in the water, whether it was our backyard pool or the beach. My parents instilled a strong work ethic in me at a young age that began as the neighborhood babysitter, to various positions at assisted living facilities and finally in EMS. I learned to take pride in the things I had and my work, whether it was completing a household chore, a writing assignment at school, or the vehicles I owned. Your history with EMS My mother was a police officer in the town I was raised in so the police and fire department was often my home away from home. I can remember being so fascinated with the ambulance and in admiration of the paramedics when I would go to visit. I told my parents when I was little that when I grew up, I would become (more…)

EEO-1 Reporting Requirement Update

In February the American Ambulance Association (AAA) alerted members that the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) had announced that it has postponed the opening of EEO-1 data reporting until early March and also extended the deadline for employers to submit their EEO-1 data until May 31, 2019.  Each year, certain federal contractors and employers with 100 or more employees are required to report the EEO-1 Component 1 data which includes information about gender, and race/ethnicity of the employer’s workforce by job type groupings.  This data is used by the EEOC to ensure compliance with the Federal non-discrimination laws. In 2016, the Obama administration required that covered employers report wage and hour data (Component 2) along with their EEO-1 Component 1 data starting in 2017.  However, the Trump administration suspended the EEO-1 pay and hour reporting (Component 2) requirements stating that they were too burdensome for employers.  ON March 4, 2019, after a lengthy legal proceeding, a federal judge lifted the Trump administration stay on wage and hour reporting stating that there was no reason to delay this reporting the Component 2 data. Last week, the EEOC announced that it will collect pay and hour data for the 2017 and 2018...

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EEOC Extends EEO-1 Reporting Deadline

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) had announced that it has postponed the opening of EEO-1 data reporting until early March and also extended the deadline for employers to submit their EEO-1 data until May 31, 2019.  The EEOC has cited that these deadlines have been postponed due to the lapse in funding as a result of government shut down.  The EEO-1 is an annual survey that requires all private employers with 100 or more employees and federal government contractors or first-tier subcontractors with 50 or more employees and a federal contract, sub­contract or purchase order amounting to $50,000 or more to file the EEO-1 report.  The EEO-1 Report data includes data about wages, gender, and race/ethnicity of the employer’s workforce by job type groupings.  This data is used by the EEOC to ensure compliance with the Federal non-discrimination laws.  For additional information about filing your organization’s EEO-1 Report, visit the EEOC’s employer resource page or contact the AAA for assistance....

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EEO-1 Survey Due March 31

The American Ambulance Association (AAA) wants to remind all employers located United States and the District of Columbia that are required to file their EEO-1 Survey Data annually that the deadline to file is quickly approaching on March 31, 2018.  Employers who have at least 100 employees are required to file EEO-1 survey annually with the EEOC.  Also, employers who are Federal contractors with 50 or more employees and at least $50,000 in contracts must file as well.  The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has many resources, including an informative reference guide How to File an EEO-1 Report available to assist employers with filing the survey data.  Employers should file on-line at the EEOC’s EEO-1 Survey Portal.  The AAA is always available to assist members with this, or any human resources issue that your organizations might be facing....

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Transgender Protections Reversal

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions sent a memo last week to Agency heads and U.S. Attorneys that he is changing the Department’s position on Transgender protections and employment discrimination. This is a reversal on the position taken in 2014 by then U.S Attorney General Eric Holder that Title VII gender discrimination protections included discrimination on the basis of gender identity. This is contrary to several Federal Court decisions and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s position that Title VII protections extend to gender identity. However, Session’s announcement may have little practical effect as many jurisdictions have state laws that provide protections from discrimination on the basis of gender identity.  Employers need to be vigilant in their efforts to maintain workplace practices that ensure a discrimination free work environment for all individuals....

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ACA Section 1557: Final Rule Published that Affect Healthcare Providers

This past July, the AAA advised our members about new Section 1557 Non-Discrimination provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) impacting ambulance providers that became effective on July 18, 2016.  On May 13, 2016, the Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) published the Final Rule aimed at improving access to care and eliminating discrimination and inequities in the provision of healthcare services.  At that time we identified several provisions in the new rules that we felt ambulance providers might have difficulty complying with.  The AAA requested some guidance from the Office of Civil Rights (OCR) regarding these challenges and had some dialogue with representatives from that office this past week. Please be sure to review the July Advisory on the AAA Website for a detailed explanation of the rule requirements.   As a brief review, the new ACA Section 1557 rules build off of existing Title VII and other discrimination laws that extend protections to previously underserved or under-represented groups of people with regard to healthcare.  The new Regulations prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability in certain health programs or activities.  In addition, the Regulations provide discrimination protections on the basis of...

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Whoa-Ho-Ho: Holiday Human Resource Risks

By Scott Moore, JD, AAA Human Resources Consultant | Updated November 19, 2015 As we approach Thanksgiving and the start of the holiday season, many employers are left wondering how to navigate the complicated employment landscape that accompanies this time of year. There is a mine field of potential problems that the season brings, ranging from religious accommodations and discrimination to sexual harassment. An employer’s best efforts to celebrate and thank employees for their hard work during the year can often result in feelings of exclusion and potential legal liability. Holiday Parties One of the most common workplace holiday celebrations, the holiday party, presents several challenges for employers. The first of which is how to appropriately name the “holiday” party. The “Christmas Party” of old that had employees ending the workday a bit early on December 23rd to have a few drinks in the office has thankfully evolved. Employers are increasingly aware of diversity in the workplace, and are changing the Christmas party into a holiday celebration in an effort to ensure that all feel welcome. While many see this as the minimization of some holiday traditions, most welcome employer awareness and efforts towards inclusion. The larger concern for most (more…)