Tag: MedStar Mobile Healthcare

Congratulations to the AIMHI Award Winners!

Today, the Academy of International Mobile Healthcare Integration (AIMHI) celebrates the winners of the second annual AIMHI Excellence in Integration Awards at the EMS World Virtual Expo. These prestigious honors celebrate and promote high-performance, high-value EMS, its partners, and leaders.

2020 winners are:

“The 2020 Excellence in Integration Award winners represent the very best in mobile integrated healthcare. We are proud to honor these exceptional programs and individuals,” said AIMHI President Chip Decker.

This year’s winners will be celebrated at the EMS World Virtual Expo, an e-learning event that will be attended by thousands of emergency medical services professionals from around the globe.

###

Academy of International Mobile Healthcare Integration (AIMHI)

The Academy of International Mobile Healthcare Integration (AIMHI) represents high performance emergency medical and mobile healthcare providers in the U.S. and abroad. Member organizations are high-performance systems that employ business practices from both the public and private sectors.  By combining industry innovation with close government oversight, AIMHI members are able to offer unsurpassed service excellence and cost efficiency.

Download the most recent AIMHI Benchmarking Report at www.aimhi.mobi.

 

Spotlight: Desiree Partain, Medstar Mobile Healthcare

Desiree Partain
Mobile Integrated Healthcare Manager
Medstar Mobile Healthcare
Fort Worth, Texas

Other Titles & Roles

MIH Manager at Large, IBSC, NAEMT member

Tell us a little about yourself.

Born and raised in sunny San Diego, California. I have a military ( marine grandfather and navy grandfather, brother, and nephew) and first responder (law enforcement mother) family background. Days were spent in the water, whether it was our backyard pool or the beach. My parents instilled a strong work ethic in me at a young age that began as the neighborhood babysitter, to various positions at assisted living facilities and finally in EMS. I learned to take pride in the things I had and my work, whether it was completing a household chore, a writing assignment at school, or the vehicles I owned.

Your history with EMS

My mother was a police officer in the town I was raised in so the police and fire department was often my home away from home. I can remember being so fascinated with the ambulance and in admiration of the paramedics when I would go to visit. I told my parents when I was little that when I grew up, I would become a paramedic. After graduating high school, I began the series of classes to obtain my EMT. When 9/11 occurred, I remember sitting in my advanced first responder class that day and knowing that I had made the best decision to be apart of the first responder industry. I got EMT certification in 2002 and my first EMS job that same year. I began the paramedic academy in 2005 where I was the academy leader and valedictorian. I received my paramedic certification and began working on the ambulance in 2006. I was also working for an air ambulance company and an adjunct instructor. In 2009, I moved to Fort Worth, Texas to gain further experience on the ambulance. I took a critical care course in 2010 and began working as a critical care/mobile health paramedic in 2011. I obtained my Bachelors in Health and Human Services in 2013 and began a quality assurance/training coordinator position specific for mobile integrated healthcare in 2014. In 2015 I began working as the MIH Manager where I obtain my CCP-C and CP-C certification and completed my Masters in Healthcare Administration in 2018.

What do you enjoy most about your job?

I love people and being able to help someone who may be having one of the worst days of their life. I view my position in EMS as more of an opportunity to be a life changer than a life saver. Being in management, my position is to lead other life changers. On the mobile integrated healthcare and critical care side, I love being a part of the innovation and out-of-the-box thinking. It’s great to be able to come to work and be in an environment that embraces change rather than the status quo of “we’ve always done it that way” type of thinking.

What is your biggest professional challenge?

Staying current. EMS and healthcare is in a constant state of change and with those changes comes new processes, protocols, and general information that need to be learned. Remaining current with the changes on top of daily responsibilities can be a challenging balancing act.

What is your typical day like?

Working in the administrative side of EMS, a typical day often involves multiple meetings either on or off site. I generally allow myself some time in the morning to go over my tasks for the day, read, and respond to emails. In between meetings, I will work on projects and to-do’s and filter questions or issues with team members. The end of the day is spent reviewing meeting notes, action items and my plan for the following day.

What are your predictions for EMS 10 years from now?

My vision for EMS 10 years from now is an industry that is even more integrated with the overall healthcare system. The use of systems to further enhance efficiency and communication in the emergency and non-emergency settings. Integrated care that starts at the time of the 9-1-1 call with the most appropriate resource deployment, on-scene management whether its offering care without transport or transport to a healthcare facility aside from an emergency room.

What advice would you give to someone new to EMS?

Take pride in what you do in this industry from your uniform appearance, to your ambulance, to the patients you serve, and to yourself. Take care of you first by practicing self care and finding a healthy balance between your personal and professional life. Create professional goals for yourself whether its through education, positions, or organizations and hold yourself accountable to accomplish those goals.

Savvik: Save on Vehicles, Supplies, and More!

Did you know that your service may be overpaying for everything from new ambulances to computers to staplers?
If you are not already purchasing necessities through the American Ambulance Association’s partnership with Savvik Buying Group, you’re missing out on deeply discounted group purchasing savings.

Watch our video below to learn more from Savvik President and AAA Treasurer Aarron Reinert.

 

[styled_box title=”Get Started With Savvik” footer=”” icon=”” class=”panel-default”]AAA members, start saving now!

Not yet a member of the AAA? Join today and start saving tomorrow.[/styled_box]

Microphone

MedStar PR Guru’s 5 Best Practices for Media Appearances

If you attended AAA’s 2015 Annual Conference & Tradeshow, there is a good chance you participated in our Becoming Irreplaceable Community and Media Relations Boot Camp. This session, presented by MedStar Mobile Healthcare’s Matt Zavadsky, covered proven strategies to become a partner in your community. Today, Matt put pen to paper over at EMS1 and shared 5 best practices for media appearances by EMS chiefs and field personnel.

Reporters will LOVE you if you incorporate their question into your answer. This allows them to take the sound bite they are looking for without having to dub in their question to make it understandable for the viewer or listener.

Read the full article at EMS1!

2015 AAA Award Winners Announced

Awards will be presented at the AAA Annual Conference and Tradeshow Awards Reception on Monday, November 2, 2015. Please join us in congratulating the winners.

J. Walter Schaefer Award

Ron Thackery, American Medical Response

The J. Walter Schaefer Award is given to someone who has positively advanced the industry as a whole. Ron exemplifies this through his tireless efforts to improve the safety of employees and patients, including work on compliance, OSHA, vehicle safety, proper use of personal protective equipment, and ambulance standards.

Robert L. Forbuss Lifetime Achievement Award

Jerry Zapolnik, Formerly of Huron Valley Ambulance

The Robert L. Forbuss Lifetime Achievement Award is named in honor of the first Executive Director of the American Ambulance Association. It recognizes a volunteer leader who has made tremendous long-term impact on the association. Over the course of Jerry’s volunteer tenure with the AAA, he has chaired numerous committees including Education and Data. Most recently, he sat on the AAA Board of Directors as a Region III representative.

President’s Award

Russell Honeycutt, Central EMS

This award is given by the President to an individual volunteer leader who has shown commitment to the advancement of the AAA above and beyond the call of duty. Russell’s work on membership recruitment and outreach in 2015 perfectly exemplifies a volunteer leader championing the great work of the association to both current and prospective members.

Distinguished Service Award

J.D. Fuiten, Metro West Ambulance

This is only the second time that the association has given a distinguished service award. J.D. has given innumerable volunteer hours to the AAA. His financial support of AAA programs and events has no equal, and his outreach to his Members of Congress has helped the AAA gain temporary Medicare relief for the industry.

Partner of the Year Award

National Rural Health Association

The National Rural Health Association is receiving the Partner of the Year Award for its ongoing support of both temporary and permanent Medicare Relief for ambulance services, including Senate 377 and House 745.

AMBY Awards

Industry and Stakeholder Education

WinnerMedStar Mobile Healthcare – MIH Book and Education

Public Relations

WinnerSunstar/Paramedics Plus – Stay Alert-Stay Alive

Employee Program

WinnerMuskogee County EMS – COACHES Team
Honorable MentionAMR – LODD Program

Clinical/Quality/Safety

WinnerAMR – Tuberculosis Program
Honorable MentionMetro West – Just Culture Program

Community Impact

WinnerLifeNet Inc. – Hannah’s Light
Honorable MentionProEMS – Overdose Sentinel Program

Spotlight: Macara Trusty

Macara Trusty
Clinical Education & QA/QI Manager/Professional Development Manager
MedStar Mobile Healthcare
Fort Worth, Texas, USA

Can you please tell us a little about yourself?

I grew up on a cattle ranch in a small Texas town, called Farmersville, about 50 miles northeast of Dallas. I spent my free time herding cattle and hauling hay. I have been married for 17 years and have two teenage daughters. We spend our family time camping, fishing, hiking, rock climbing, and watching movies.

How did you come to work in EMS?

I came to work in EMS after a car accident in 1989 that almost killed my grandfather and resulted in my having a broken back and many other internal injuries. The small town in which I lived had only one ambulance, staffed by volunteers. There were a total of seven critical patients (including myself) on the scene, and we had to wait up to 30 minutes for the next ambulance to arrive. Having been raised in a family of public servants, I had previously considered becoming a nurse like my grandmother, but quickly changed my plan after the accident.

In 1994, I enrolled in the local EMT program. I had every intention of working in the town to give back for what the town and its people had done for us. However, I also quickly realized that working in such a small town, where everyone knew everyone else, may not be such a good idea. I began working in Dallas instead, then joined MedStar in 1997. I have been involved in EMS for 21 years now. Although I can’t honestly say I’ve loved every minute of it, I can say that this job has taught me so much and made me a better person. I wouldn’t trade that for anything!

What do you enjoy most about your job?

The best part of my job is helping people accomplish goals they have set for themselves! As a Paramedic, I would say “I love helping patients”. In my current role, I help EMTs and Paramedics become better EMTs and Paramedics. I help civilians accomplish the goal of becoming an EMT or First Responder. I help our leadership team become better leaders. I’m still helping people, but the reach seems greater in this position. It’s NOT “one patient at a time”. I work with an awesome team and it’s heartwarming to see everyone pull together to accomplish a goal, or to help others accomplish their goals.

What is your biggest professional challenge?

My biggest professional challenge is balancing the needs of the entire organization with training and education and encouraging others to explore alternative delivery methods for the education they want to provide, without having a traditional classroom session. Convincing some that it’s okay to embrace technology, provide education and convenience for your employees (and you too!), and show the “millennial employees” that you can understand their communication style can be quite a challenge some times.

What is your typical day like?

What is a typical day? Do those even exist? My typical day starts with the end of the day before. I look to see what classes we have scheduled for the following day, to see if we need to reconfigure classrooms, rearrange table & chairs, etc. When I arrive, I meet briefly with my team to find out what everyone has planned for the day, what challenges we may encounter, what meetings are on the agenda, and to get feedback from other meetings. Every day is different, so some days I will teach, other days are full of meetings with various departments, and some days I spend catching up on emails, building classes, etc.

How has participation in AAA helped your organization?

The education and thought sharing is extremely helpful. The ideas shared by the visionaries involved in AAA help make our profession stronger, both locally and nationally.

Health Affairs shows “frequent flier” needs taper over time

Last week, Health Affairs published a study on the so-called “super utilizers” of the healthcare system, those who are in and out of emergency rooms with such frequency that their need for readmission is nearly assured.

The researchers found that these folks have an intense need that tapers off over time. Of the 1,682 identified as such, just 28 percent fell into the category after 12 months. Baseline spending decreased from $113,522 per capita to $47,017 the following year when they were enrolled in a program to help them stay on top of their health. The study, performed by the medical center Denver Health, analyzed nearly 5,000 patients and found that 3 percent were accounting for 30 percent of adult charges between May 1, 2011 and April 30, 2013.

Read the full article in the Dallas/Fort Worth Healthcare Daily.

MedStar Helps Reunite Baby, Mom After Tragic Crash

(Details and video courtesy of Fox 4 News and Medstar.)

On June 25, Sergeant Colby Bozo and his wife Kristen were driving home when their vehicle was struck by a stolen car being pursued in a police chase. Sadly, Colby Bozo was killed on impact, and Kristen, then 37 weeks pregnant, was very seriously injured and required an emergency caesarian section.

AAA member MedStar Mobile Healthcare, in coordination with John Peter Smith Hospital, and Cook Children’s Hospital surprised Kristen by arranging for her to see her newborn baby for the first time. Staff took a detour to Cook Children’s Hospital during mom’s ambulance transfer from JPS in Fort Worth to Baylor Rehabilitation Center in Dallas.

George Church, a MedStar Operations Supervisor who helped coordinate the reunion, said at the time, “I’ve been in EMS a long time, and there are very few moments that get to me any more—this one got to me.”

Great job, MedStar, JPS, and Cooks Children’s!

Video from Fox4News.com

Supporters of Kristen and the baby are invited to donate at a Fund.ly page.