LifeWorks October Feature: Work-Life Balance and Productivity

October Feature: Work-Life Balance and Productivity Ten Tips for Fitting Work and Life Together Would you like to move beyond feeling stressed or overwhelmed by your personal and work responsibilities? Or learn how to achieve personal and professional success on your own terms? “Knowing how to manage the way work and life fit together is a modern skill set we all need to succeed,” says Cali Williams Yost, an internationally recognized flexible workplace strategist and author of the books Tweak It: Make What Matters to You Happen Every Day and Work+Life: Finding the Fit That’s Right for You. Here are Yost’s 10 strategies: Remember that work-life fit is unique for each of us. “Simply put, there is no work-life balance or perfect 5050 split between your work and your personal life,” Yost says. “If you do happen to hit a balance, you can’t maintain it because your realities are always changing, personally and professionally.” There’s also no “right way” to achieve a good work-life fit. Your goal is to find your unique, ever-changing fit, the way your work and personal realities fit together day-to-day and at major life transitions. Don’t compare yourself to others. Find the fit that’s right for...

This content is available only to AAA members.
Log In or Register

Confidential support for AAA member organizations

Confidential support for employees of AAA member organizations As first responders, you regularly bear witness to traumatic events, and you directly experience loss, sadness, and sometimes even frightening violence outside the norm of the human experience. Exposure to trauma can cause emotional reactions for weeks or even months following. If you’re struggling to cope with difficult emotions or dealing with symptoms of an acute stress reaction, the American Ambulance Association can help. Confidential counseling from LifeWorks—At no cost to you. LifeWorks is your employee assistance program (EAP) and well-being resource. We’re here for you any time, 24/7, 365 days a year, with expert advice, resources, referrals to counseling, and connections to specialty providers including substance abuse professionals. Toll-free immediate support by phone if you’re in distress. Up to three face-to-face confidential counseling sessions per issue. Counseling live by video to meet clinical needs and preferences. All counselors are experienced therapists with a minimum Master’s degree in psychology, social work, educational counseling, or other social services field. Onsite CISM Services – Round-the-clock support for critical incidents. If your ambulance service has experienced an employee death, severe vehicle accident, staff suicide, or other traumatic event, AAA is here to help. Email info@ambulance.org...

This content is available only to AAA members.
Log In or Register

LifeWorks: Get Involved

LifeWorks: Get Involved. Choosing Volunteer Work. Helping others can be one of the most rewarding experiences of your life. You can plant trees in a park, coach youth sports, stuff envelopes for a political campaign, help an adult learn to read, raise money for the arts, visit hospice patients, and more – there’s almost no limit to the opportunities open to you as a volunteer, and people of any age and background can find a way to give back. Here are some ways to find a project that needs you. Understanding Why You Want To Volunteer Helping others can be one of the most rewarding experiences of your life. You can plant trees in a park, coach youth sports, stuff envelopes for a political campaign, help an adult learn to read, raise money for the arts, visit hospice patients, and more – there’s almost no limit to the opportunities open to you as a volunteer, and people of any age and background can find a way to give back. Here are some ways to find a project that needs you. Your reasons for volunteering might be personal or work related. Deciding On Specifics • What skills to you want to...

This content is available only to AAA members.
Log In or Register

LifeWorks Adapting to Change: Growing Stronger Through Change

Illness. Divorce. Financial difficulties. Job loss. We face unexpected changes and challenges throughout our lives. How can you learn to keep up a positive attitude and stay strong through life’s unwanted changes and challenges? The first step in coping with a crisis or challenge in your personal or work life is to put on your “reality glasses.” Reality glasses, a concept developed by Stephen Williams, an organizational psychologist from the U.K., are the glasses you use to look at and understand what’s going on in your world. When you put on your reality glasses, you stop, step back, and ask yourself: “Am I seeing this as it really is? “How big is this problem, really?” Or “Have I got this out of proportion?” When you assess the situation, you may discover that the problem or challenge you are facing isn’t as serious as you had thought. Or you may discover that it is serious indeed. But facing your problems with your reality glasses on helps you gain a sense of control. “You’ve moved into the driving seat,” says Dr. Williams. And that’s the first step in growing stronger through change. Once you’ve got your reality glasses on, here are two...

This content is available only to AAA members.
Log In or Register

September Is Suicide Awareness Month

This past year, nearly every EMS conference featured one or more sessions related to the mental health of EMS professionals. This November in Las Vegas, the American Ambulance Association Annual Conference & Trade Show will feature several sessions that will perform a reverse case analysis of PTSD and other mental health conditions affecting members of our profession. It is wonderful to see this issue being brought to the forefront given how many years the culture was to “toughen up”. This Friday begins Suicide Awareness Month. Awareness for mental health issues is at an all-time high in EMS but we still have a long way to go. Just two weeks ago we lost yet another Paramedic in my community to suicide and the numbers are rising. According to a study conducted by Fitch & Associates as part of the Ambulance Service Managers Program, mental health struggles and depression among fire and EMS professionals are widespread, more than 10 times that of the average American. However, a survey conducted by the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians (NAEMT) revealed that the majority of respondents stated that they were dissatisfied with the mental health services available through their employer and that most respondents (more…)

Mental Health Support: Getting Help for Depression

Many of us struggle to tell the difference between depression and sadness because the primary symptom of depression is pervasive sadness. But it’s important to know that there is a significant difference. Sadness is a normal emotion that is usually triggered by a hurtful, challenging, or disappointing experience, event, or situation. We tend to feel sad about something. When that something changes or when we adjust or accept it, our emotional hurt tends to fade. With depression it’s not the same. Depression is a mental illness that affects our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors in a pervasive manner. We feel sad about everything. With depression, sometimes that sadness is present despite the fact that, from the outside looking in, everything is going well. Depression doesn’t require a specific event, situation, or experience as a trigger. Depression infiltrates all aspects of our lives making everything less enjoyable and less important. Depression can be debilitating and significantly impact our daily life function. The most common symptoms include a persistent sad, anxious, or empty mood; feelings of hopelessness or pessimism; feelings of guilt, worthlessness, or helplessness; a loss of interest or pleasure in hobbies and once enjoyable activities; sleeping difficulties, including trouble falling asleep...

This content is available only to AAA members.
Log In or Register

Lifeworks: Overload at Work

You aren’t alone if you often feel overloaded at work. More than two-thirds of US workers suffer from work overload, according to Kelton Research/Cornerstone. Overload can increase your stress and make you feel out of control even if you enjoy your job. Stress and overload can also affect your productivity, work relationships, and performance. If you are working longer hours or feel overwhelmed by all that you have to do, you may be experiencing overload at work. If the fast pace that was once challenging starts instead to leave you feeling drained, that may be a sign of overload. Learning to cope with your workload can reduce your stress and help you stay productive and valuable to your organization. Gaining understanding and control of your workload Here are ways to gain control of your workload: Realize that you can reduce overload. There may be parts of your job that you can’t control, such as seasonal variations in workload. But you can control how you prepare for the peak season. Focus on what you can change, not what you can’t. Know your limits. Some people thrive on a heavy workload, while others feel stressed by small increases in their responsibilities. If (more…)

Lifeworks: Building Your Resilience With Self-Care

Building Your Resilience With Self-Care Resilience is the ability to adapt well in the face of adversity, such as when you may be experiencing personal or family issues, a serious health concern, work stress, money worries, or other challenges. One of the key ways to build resilience is to focus on self-care. “Taking care of yourself,” writes the American Psychological Association, “helps to keep your mind and body primed to deal with situations that require resilience.” Here are some ways to take care of yourself to help build your resilience. Make meaningful connections. Strong ties — to family, friends, co-workers, and community groups — help you find the social and emotional support you need to bounce back from setbacks or disappointments. • Make time for your closest relationships. • Talk about what you are going through with others. • Spend time with like-minded people. Pay attention to your physical self-care. • Make exercise a priority. • Follow a healthy diet. • Follow good sleep practices. Reframe how you view problems and challenges. A key element of resilience is your perception of an event, according to the Columbia University psychologist George Bonanno, who has been studying resilience for 25 years. • (more…)