Cataldo Ambulance Service Wellness Couch to 5K

In October 2016, Kelli Megill, a Human Resources Generalist at AAA member company, Cataldo Ambulance Service based in Somerville, MA, attended the safety symposium hosted by their worker’s compensation carrier. Much of the symposium focused on why employees get hurt and what employers can do to help stop the trend. A reoccurring thread in all of the most effective injury prevention programs was promoting the fitness and wellness of an organization’s employees. Kelli decided to launch what has been the most embraced wellness initiative in the 40 year history of the company. The Cataldo Couch to 5K Program began about 8 weeks ago and culminating with the 5K road race/walk on June 5th. Kelli pitched the program to the other members of the Human Resources team and Ron Quaranto, the Chief Operating Officer (AAA Region 1 Director). The program now has over 100 employees participating in the program which is more than just the run/walk on June 4th. Cataldo has tackled wellness events in the past, including the company hockey team, Spartan races, and other chartable road races. The company, which provides emergency services to several of the communities along the Boston Marathon route, sponsored several employees to run the...

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Spotlight: Ron Quaranto, Cataldo Ambulance

Ron Quaranto Chief Operating Officer, Cataldo Ambulance Service Vice President, Massachusetts Ambulance Association AAA Board, Director Region 1 Somerville, MA Tell us a little about yourself, please. I grew up in Natick, Massachusetts and graduated Natick High School in 1988. I am married and have two children; my daughter, Courtney, is 19 and my son, Justin, is 16. I like to exercise. I enjoy hockey, which I play two days a week, and I run 3–4 days a week. How did you come to work in the industry? How long have you been involved? In 1989, I began my career at Chaulk Ambulance in Natick, Massachusetts as a chair car driver while taking their EMT course. I worked as an EMT for many years and became a base Supervisor. I went to Paramedic School in 1994, and was certified as a Nationally Registered Paramedic in 1995. I then became a Field Supervisor for AMR and quickly moved up the ranks to Director of Operations overseeing operations from Boston to Worcester. In 2006 I moved over to Cataldo Ambulance Service, where I am currently employed as their COO. What do you enjoy most about your job? I enjoy helping people. I (more…)

As a current mobile integrated health provider, we recognize the values of an MIH program which most importantly provides quality patient care to those in need, often in the comfort of their own homes. This is often done under the direction of the patient’s primary care physician in conjunction with the patient’s healthcare team. This allows for the patient to maintain their quality of life while receiving the medical attention they need—and ultimately reducing the healthcare expenses of hospitalization.

Ron Quaranto
COO, Cataldo Ambulance Service

Cataldo Ambulance’s Ron Quaranto on Mobile Integrated Health

“Save Lives, Not Seconds” member editorial

Don’t miss the fantastic member-written editorial, Save lives, not seconds, in Wednesday’s Boston Globe. Submitted by Cataldo Ambulance’s Tom Kimball, it gets to the heart of many issues with using response times as the only performance metric. (Emphasis below is ours.) Many cities and towns in Massachusetts still judge the performance of their ambulance services using metrics like response times, which can miss the point. An additional two minutes waiting for an ambulance will rarely make a difference for a trauma patient facing emergency surgery that may take hours. Patient outcome is a more valuable measure of whether a medical service is doing right by people. In many areas of health care these days, it is the gold standard, a key factor in determining how much insurance companies pay service providers. Changing the terms of ambulance companies’ contracts to make good patient outcomes the goal could greatly improve the quality of medical care across the state — and save lives. Read the full editorial over at the Boston Globe.