Time: 9:00AM to 9:45AM | Track: Executive Leadership | Presenter: Jonathan Washko, North Shore LIJH

 

Part II  we will continue to examine the underlying reasons for EMS systems failing.

Unfortunately, many “failed” EMS systems are measured by recent events, no matter how successful they may have been in the past. Finances, changing political climates, poor leadership, or a significant high-profile event can all trigger a system to be declared as “failed.” In some cases, a combination of these factors can create a perfect storm that ultimately yields a replacement of the existing system or incumbent provider.

Because no industry-accepted standards exist in terms of measuring success of an EMS system, oftentimes decision-makers have only anecdotal or best practice comparative data to contrast against. This lack of standardized industry benchmarking gives a wide berth for naysayers to cast stones, often relying on raw emotions or carefully crafted data to influence public policy or decision-makers.

Also, as systems begin to financially fail, a tradeoff is usually applied by leadership where quality, service reliability and compensation are sacrificed in order to remain viable or to meet financial targets. If done improperly, this can begin a downward spiral that feeds upon itself, thus creating a negative synergistic effect and decreasing the time of survival versus prolonging it.